Author Archives: Hannah

Book Announcement: Religions, Nations, and Transnationalism in Multiple Modernities


Announcement: Academic Khōjā Studies Listserv

The Western Indian Ocean Studies Program at Florida International University in Miami is pleased to announce the launch of its academic Khōjā Studies Listserv. Khōjā Studies is an interdisciplinary field of study that connects religious studies, diaspora studies, and postcolonial studies to South Asian and African area studies within the framework of the Western Indian Ocean to answer historical questions of aesthetics, authority, identity, and the circulation of ideas across the littoral.

The listserv is particularly sensitive to providing full-text and PDFs of articles for scholars in the Global South and providing a platform for the expression of emic perspectives of the communities researched. Most importantly, what drives the listserv is intellectual curiosity that crosses disciplinary boundaries.

To sign up, please visit https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/khojastudies

For more information on Western Indian Ocean Studies at FIU, please visit http://khoja.fiu.edu/

Call for Papers: Parenthood in Transition: Borderlands, Transnational Mobility and Welfare Society in the Nordic Countries

We invite interested researchers to submit an abstract for an edited book concerning transitions and change connected to parenthood inside and across the Nordic borders at a historical time when the ideal of free movement across borders in the Nordic countries has been dismantled. The book ties in discussions on transnational parenthood of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers as well as minority parenthood of the indigenous Sámi communities living in the Arctic transnational area of Sápmi. The book also concerns transitions in the Finnish and European Roma families, lives of families living on both sides of Finnish and Norwegian border with Russia, and ‘old migrants’ such as Finns in Sweden. The book will analyse parenthood from two perspectives: 1. How do welfare state and its services construct norms for respectable parenthood and shape the ways in which parenthood is enacted? 2. How do minority parents themselves negotiate the meanings and requirements attached to parenthood and organize their transnational everyday lives?

The economic crisis has created tensions for the modern welfare state, which has been the center of Nordic policies since the late 1970s. The current restructuring of the welfare state has been guided by neoliberal policies and has thus resulted to growing social exclusion and uncertainty. This reform may have consequences for the service provision for newly arrived migrants. Nordic countries are often perceived as being the examples of successful equality policies and outsiders in colonial processes. However, in this book, it is understood that Nordic countries continue to take part in processes of othering and the values of equality can be used to build up narratives, which exclude those who do not fit into these ideals. This can result in processes of racialization being denied and made invisible. This kind of welfare state nationalism is typical in Nordic countries, and it shapes the ways in which racism and stigmatization occur. Racialized and ethicized parents’ everyday encounters with welfare services such as in social work, daycare, schools, and healthcare can also be influenced by these discourses. Furthermore, despite the similarities, Nordic countries are also very different in terms of migration histories, policies and societal discourses on migrants.

We seek chapters that will provide unique perspectives to the discussions of Nordic minority parenthood.  As the aim is to include a number of chapters that provide comparative analysis between different countries, we also encourage scholars to co-author articles with colleagues whose research focuses on another Nordic country. As editors we may also match abstracts on similar subjects to create Nordic co-authoring partners. Please let us know if you are ready for joint writing with another Nordic author.

Prospective authors are invited to submit an abstract proposal on or before 15th of September 2017, together with:
 
• Name, institutional details and contact information
• Short bio note with the most relevant publications
• Title of proposed chapter
• Abstract of 300–500 words, detailing (in this specific order):research question(s), theory/concepts, data, methods, and expected results
A note on the possibility for joint writing based on the editors’ suggestions

Abstracts should be sent to: johanna.hiitola[at]chydenius.fi

Authors will be notified by the editors by 15th of October about further steps. Funding will be applied to arrange a meeting with the authors, where draft chapters will be discussed.

Full chapter (7000-8000 words) submissions by September 15, 2018.

Routledge is tentatively interested in publishing the edited volume.All manuscripts undergo both editorial review process and a peerreview process.

Editors:
Dr. Kati Turtiainen, Social Work (University of Jyväskylä, Kokkola 
University Consortium Chydenius, Finland)
Dr. Johanna Hiitola, Gender Studies/Social Work (University of 
Jyväskylä, Kokkola University Consortium Chydenius, Finland)
Dr. Marja Tiilikainen (Migration Institute of Finland)
Dr. Sabine Gruber, Social Work (Linköping University, Sweden)

Inquiries:
Johanna Hiitola (johanna.hiitola[at]chydenius.fi)

Call for Papers: ANU Religion Conference 2018

Sacred Sites/Sacred Stories: Global Perspectives

05-07 April 2018, ANU College of Asia & the Pacific,
The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia
Abstract Deadline: 15 October 2017

http://www.anu.edu.au/events/sacred-sitessacred-stories-global-perspectives

The study of sacred sites is a prominent feature in a number of disciplines. Sacred sites and stories and pilgrimage are the theme of the conference. Topics of enquiry range from the role of sacred sites in religious traditions, through to how sacred sites form part of the development of modern tourist industries, the role of sacred sites in international relations and the ways in which sacred sites can be the focus for disputes. At a time when many sacred sites and their stories face challenges due to economic development, environmental change and the impact of mass pilgrimage and tourism the conference offers an opportunity for wide-ranging discussions of the past, present and future of sacred sites and stories and their significance in the world today.

The conference will have the following panels:
•    Pilgrimage and Tourism
•    Historical Perspectives
•    Visual Arts and Architecture
•    Indigenous Traditions
•    Competition and Contestation

We welcome proposals for paper presentations that address the theme of one of these panels. Individual papers that are relevant to the main theme but are not aligned with any of the proposed panel streams will also be considered for presentation.

•    Panel Proposals. While proposals for individual papers are welcome, applicants are also encouraged to collaborate with peers to propose panels of 3-4 papers that converge on a particular theme.

In view of the major role that Australia and the Asia Pacific region plays in national and international discussions about sacred sites and sacred stories we particularly welcome panels on Asian, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Pacific perspectives on sacred sites. We also welcome papers covering a range of time frames, from pre-history to the contemporary era, and from all traditions and locations.

If you are interested, please send your abstract (150 words), including a note of which stream your proposal addresses, and bio (80 words) to the following email (davidwj_kim@yahoo.co.uk). The conference fee is AU$350, but for masters students, doctoral candidates and early career researchers who do not have full-time positions the fee will be AU$250. The conference cost includes registration fee, conference dinner and refreshments. The two best papers submitted by HDR students will be awarded (AU$500 each). To be considered for this award, the full paper must be submitted at least one month before the conference (by 07 March 2018). There will be a limited number of bursaries available for some accepted masters students, doctoral candidates and early career researchers. Please note that those selected to receive bursaries will be informed of this before the conference but the bursaries will not be dispersed until the papers have been presented at the conference. In addition, selected papers may be considered for publication in a book volume.

Contacts:
Dr David W. Kim (Australian National University)
Email: davidwj_kim@yahoo.co.uk

Dr Peter Friedlander (Australian National University)
Email: peter.friedlander@anu.edu.au

A/Prof McComas Taylor (Australian National University)
Email: mccomas.taylor@anu.edu.au

Dr Barbara Nelson (Australian National University)
Email: barbara.nelson@anu.edu.au

Confrence: Religion(s) and Power(s)

Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania
October 5-6, 2017

The Lithuanian Society for the Study of Religions in cooperation with Latvian Society for the Study of Religions and Estonian Society for the Study of Religions invites proposals for its upcoming international conference “Religion(s) and Power(s)”. To encourage new directions in the critical research of interrelations of religion(s) and power(s) from a broad range of approaches, we are seeking proposals on a wide range of topics including:
•    Private and public religions
•    Religions and politics
•    Non-religion and power
•    Religious inequalities and discrimination
•    Religions, human rights and justice
•    Powers of/within religions
•    Religion and nationalism
•    Mythology, divine kinship and power
•    Religion and colonialism
,•    Religions and education.
Other topics related to the conference theme are also encouraged.

Conference paper and session proposals must be sent by June 15, 2017. Please send your 250-300 word abstract and a 200-word personal bio to email: religiousstudieslt@gmail.com

Important conference dates:
June 15, 2017 – submission of conference paper and session proposals;
July 1, 2017 – notification of paper/session proposal acceptance;

July 1, 2017 – opening of registration for the conference;

August 15, 2017 – closing of registration for the conference;

September 1, 2017 – announcement of the conference program.


Conference Registration Fees:
–    Members of national associations of Baltic States associations for the study of religions – 50 EUR
–    Permanent/full-time faculty and non-affiliated participants – 80 EUR;
–    Graduate students and emeritus faculty – 50 EUR;
–    Late bird conference fee – 100 EUR.

Publishing announcement: Migration and Society

Journal published by Berghahn

Migration is at the heart of the transformation of societies and communities and touches the lives of people across the globe. Migration and Society is a new interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal advancing debate about emergent trends in all types of migration. We invite work that situates migration in a wider historical and societal context, including attention to experiences and representations of migration, critical theoretical perspectives on migration, and the social, cultural, and legal embeddedness of migration. Global in its scope, we particularly encourage scholarship from and about the global South as well as the North.
Migration and Society addresses both dynamics and drivers of migration; processes of settlement and integration; and transnational practices and diaspora formation. We publish theoretically informed and empirically based articles of the highest quality, especially encouraging work that interrogates and transcends the boundaries between the social sciences and the arts and humanities.
We also welcome articles that reflect on the complexities of both studying and teaching migration, as well as pieces that focus on the relationship between scholarship and the policies and politics of migration.
Submissions are welcome for consideration in one of the five journal sections:
o   Research Articles: Each issue will include articles (max. 8,000 words) addressing a key theme, in addition to a range of other migration-and-society related articles
o   The People & Places section consists of shorter pieces (2,000-4,000 words), including notes from the field, ‘migrant voices’, and interviews with scholars, practitioners, and policymakers
o   The Reflections section invites critical reflections (max. 5,000 words) on migration research and teaching
o   The Creative Encounters section invites poetry, shorter prose pieces, photo essays, and other  engagements with migration
o   Each issue concludes with a Book Reviews section (800 words for single book reviews, 13-1400 words for reviews of two books, 15-1600 words for three books).
 
Migration and Society is edited by Mette Louise Berg (UCL) and Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (UCL).
 
Inaugural issue (publication August 2018)
Hospitality and hostility towards migrants: global perspectives
Recent years have seen an unprecedented scale of global forced migration. Millions of people have fled conflicts and mass human rights violations as well as poverty and persecution. Across sites of transit and settlement migrants have been met by a combination of hospitality and hostility.
For the inaugural issue of Migration and Society, we welcome theoretically and empirically informed contributions that help us develop a more nuanced understanding of the complex responses and experiences of hospitality and hostility around the world and in different historical contexts. We invite contributions that offer critical analyses of the following questions:
1.      How, and why, have different actors responded to the actual, prospective, and imagined arrival of migrants across time and space?
2.      How have migrants and refugees experienced and responded to different, and at times overlapping, processes of hospitality and hostility in sites of transit and settlement?
3.      What are the politics and the poetics of hospitality and hostility towards migrants in different spaces?
4.      As ‘new’ migrants join established diasporas and transnational communities, how have ‘locals’ and ‘established’ migrants and refugees responded to ‘newly’ displaced people?
5.      How, why, and with what effects have diverse media represented processes of migration? Who has been rendered (hyper)visible and audible, and/or invisible, inaudible, and silenced in different representations of migration?
6.      What are the historic resonances, continuities, and discontinuities of contemporary dynamics of hospitality and hostility towards migrants?
We especially welcome articles that examine – and interrogate – the applicability of the concepts of hospitality and hostility in different settings; and that explore the relationship between these and other concepts, including cosmopolitanism, welcome, conviviality, neighbourliness, and solidarity, from the perspective of the global South as well as the North.
 
Deadline for submitting articles for inclusion in issue 1: 30 September 2017.
 

Book Announcement: Let them not return

 Publication of the edited volume LET THEM NOT RETURN: Sayfo – The Genocide against the Assyrian, Syriac and Chaldean Christians in the Ottoman Empire.  In May the publisher offers it at a 50% discount (see attached code). Link to table of contents: http://www.berghahnbooks.com/title/GauntLet
 
See for my latest article about the same theme in Genocide Studies International: http://www.utpjournals.press/doi/abs/10.3138/gsi.10.2.04 
‘What Could Not Be Written: A Study of the Oral Transmission of Sayfo Genocide Memory Among Assyrians’.