Author Archives: Madisun

Lecturer Position in Religions of South Asia

Lecturer Position in Religions of South Asia
 
The Department of Religious Studies in the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh seeks to appoint a Lecturer in Religions of South Asia. Required teaching would include survey courses on Religion in India and Religion in Asia and upper-level courses in the candidate’s areas of specialization.  Scholars whose work extends to the Indian diaspora, involves issues of social justice, and/or addresses the relationship of religion and health are especially encouraged.  We welcome candidates whose teaching and research interests contribute to the thematic clusters in the department and who can form connections with colleagues in allied departments, programs, and centers at the University. PhD is expected at time of appointment. The position is outside the tenure stream and starts September 1, 2018, pending budgetary approval. The initial contract is for three years and is renewable. The Dietrich School has a career development path for non-tenure-stream faculty with the possibility of promotions within the rank of Lecturer. 
 
To apply, please submit a letter of application describing current and future teaching and research directions, including a statement on your contributions to diversity; C.V.; one article-length scholarly writing sample; two sample syllabi; evidence of teaching effectiveness (e.g., student evaluations); and contact information for three references online to  https://facultysearch.as.pitt.edu/apply/index/MjIy For each reference, you will have the opportunity to input a personal email address or an email address generated through Interfolio’s Online Application Delivery.  In both cases, an email notification will be sent to the designated address with instructions about uploading the letters to our system. In order to ensure full consideration, applications must be received by February 20, 2018. For additional information about the position, contact relgst@pitt.edu The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and values equality of opportunity, human dignity and diversity. EEO/AA/M/F/Vets/Disabled
 

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP: DECOLONISING THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN THE ERA OF INTERNATIONALISED EDUCATION (Singapore, 7th/8th March 2018)

INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP: DECOLONISING THE SOCIAL SCIENCES IN THE ERA OF INTERNATIONALISED EDUCATION (Singapore, 7th/8th March 2018)

Summary of the Workshop

The social sciences are typically understood as having been formally institutionalised in the manner that we recognise them today in a specific Western context. The significance of this is often overlooked despite it continuing to play a role in shaping approaches to teaching and research in the social sciences today. Nonetheless, there have been numerous scholars, particularly those from the periphery, who have highlighted the ways in which the social sciences remain thoroughly ethnocentric. These scholars argue that the perspectives and contributions of various minorities, particularly non-Western scholars, have been excluded from academic knowledge production. Crucially, this exclusion has not been due to a dearth of erudite non-Western scholarship, but due to historical factors that produced Orientalist hierarchies in imagining which types of scholars produce the most useful knowledge. In recent years there has been an intensification of calls to overcome ‘academic imperialism’ by way of ‘decolonising the curriculum’. This workshop will bring together a diverse and interdisciplinary range of participants to discuss the ways in which the social sciences remain parochial and why. In order to further the discussion in a way that it often isn’t, special emphasis will be placed on theorising innovative proposals that may address the problems that are identified. This FREE workshop will provide an inclusive space for scholars, students and those who are curious to discuss these pressing themes regardless of occupation, status or disciplinary specialism.

Keynote Speakers

Syed Farid Alatas is Professor of Sociology at the National University of Singapore. He is also appointed to the Department of Malay Studies at NUS and headed that department from 2007 till 2013. His books and articles include Ibn Khaldun(Oxford University Press, 2013); Applying Ibn Khaldun: The Recovery of a Lost Tradition in Sociology (Routledge, 2014), and (with Vineeta Sinha) Sociological Theory Beyond the Canon (Palgrave, 2017). His areas of interest are the sociology of Islam, social theory, religion and reform, intra- and inter-religious dialogue, and the study of Orientalism.

Biko Agozino is a Professor of Sociology and Africana Studies at Virginia Tech, USA. He was educated at Edinburgh University (Ph.D.), Cambridge University (MPhil), and University of Calabar (BSc). He is the author of Counter-Colonial Criminology: A Critique of Imperialist Reason, London, Pluto Press, 2003; and of Black Women and the Criminal Justice System: Towards the Decolonisation of Victimisation, Aldershot, Ashgate, 1997, among other works. He directed and produced ‘Shouters and the Control Freak Empire’, winner of the Best International Short Documentary, Columbia Gorge Film Festival, USA, 2011.

When

Wednesday 7th March 2018: 15:00 – 18:30

Thursday 8th March 2018: 11:00 – 16:00

Where

The workshop will be held at the University of Liverpool in Singapore, Block 29B, Tampines Aveune 1, 528694, Singapore.

Registration

Participation in the workshop is FREE. Registration is essential to facilitate appropriate catering and room bookings. There are a limited number of places available which will be filled on a first-come, first-serve basis. To register, send an email with your name and email address in the body of the email to: ULIS@Liverpool.ac.uk. Please indicate whether you wish to attend on day 1, day 2 or both days. Registration will close on Wednesday 28th February 2018.

Financial Support

Multiple travel assistance grants of £100 are available for scholars attending the workshop that are based in category B and category C countries (as defined by the International Sociological Association: http://www.isa-sociology.org/en/about-isa/membership/table-of-economies-by-category/). Scholars who wish to be considered for one of these grants should email ULIS@Liverpool.ac.uk with a brief description of why they wish to attend the workshop. The travel assistance grants will be paid to selected participants on condition of attending all of the workshop sessions.

Programme

Day 1: Wednesday 7th March

15:10 – Audience to be seated

15:20 – Welcome by Dr Leon Moosavi, Director of the University of Liverpool in Singapore

15:30 – Professor Syed Farid Alatas – ‘Decolonising the Social Sciences: Resurrecting Knowledge in the South’

16:15 – Professor Biko Agozino – ‘The Decolonization Paradigm and the Postcolonial Criminology Perspective’

17:00 – Discussion

17:30 – Open buffet with networking opportunity

18:30 – Event end

Day 2: Thursday 8th March

11:00-13:00 – Symposium discussion 1: The problem: In what ways and why are the social sciences ethnocentric? What other forms of exclusion in academia need to be addressed?

13:00-14:00 – Open buffet with networking opportunity

14:00-16:00 – Symposium discussion 2: The solutions: Can the social sciences be decolonised and if so, how? What has already been done that seems to be working?  

16:00 – Event end

————

ALL WELCOME

Diaspora: Diasporic Lands: Tibetan Refugees and their Transformation since the Exodus

Diasporic Lands: Tibetan Refugees and their Transformation since the Exodus

Sudeep Basu

Orient BlackSwan, 2018

A large number of Tibetans migrated to India following the Chinese occupation of Tibet in 1950. Till the end of the twentieth century, Tibetan studies focused primarily on Buddhism and pre-1950s Tibetan history in relation to Tibetan exiles, influenced largely by Western notions of Tibetan culture in an exotic ‘Shangri-La’. In Diasporic Lands moves away from this norm to study the dynamics of Tibetan refugees’ emergent culture in the midst of their hosts, and in distinctly urban settings.

Based on the author’s ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Darjeeling town, West Bengal, this volume looks at how places and identities are redefined and transformed by refugees negotiating their ‘belonging’ in an alien country over time. The earlier strategy of the ‘myth of return’ to their homeland has had to be reworked, and in the process, Tibetan refugees have moved away from the stereotyped ways in which they are portrayed to create plural identities of their own. The volume also looks at how the refugee–host dynamic—where the ‘hosts’ are Indians, Nepalis and ‘Bhutia’ Tibetans—plays out in such a situation.

Tibetan refugees in India grapple with notions of what Tibet as the homeland stands for, what it means to truly belong to the host territory and to acquire Indian citizenship. The ethnographic analysis, which reflects on Tibet’s past and the ‘exile present’, helps us to understand the ‘lived meanings’ that Tibetan refugees in Darjeeling attach to their life in exile and to the spaces they live and work in. It also shows how the experience of movement to and from a place alters the idea that people have of their relation to a specific place in the diaspora, and how this ‘sense of place’ adds meaning and purpose to refugee lives.

This volume will be of interest to students and scholars of sociology, social anthropology, politics, cultural studies and migration studies, as well as policy makers and human rights activists.

http://www.orientblackswan.com/BookDescription?isbn=978-93-5287-085-1&id=35&t=c

Call for papers Religious identity and education

Call for papers Religious identity and education: A response to contemporary global pressures A special issue in the Forum for International Research in Education slotted for publication in fall 2018. One of the challenges and pressures which globalization has engendered for national education systems, schools, and classrooms worldwide is the growth of religious diversity. Thus, in many places, religious diversity has become a new reality of schooling, to which educators do not necessarily know how to properly respond. Moreover, in the context of religious resurgences around the globe, the growth of religious diversity is often associated with the increase in significance of one’s religious identity and its ardent embrace. By contrast, in secularized settings, there is often resistance and animosity to open manifestations of religious identities. Furthermore, as is true with any social identity, religious and secular identities often become markers that differentiate “us” and “them,” and, therefore, may breed inter-group tensions and conflicts. This special issue addresses this new social reality and its educational implications. We invite papers, which discuss if and how educational establishments worldwide, whether public or private, religious or secular, respond to the problems associated with the surge in diversity and significance of religious identity in the age of globalization and its pressures. We especially welcome papers which comparatively examine if and how teaching of, about, or from religious or spiritual traditions reflects, aggravates, or alleviates social, cultural, economic, or political inter-group tensions inside or outside school walls. Keywords: religious diversity; religious identity; secular identity; education; secularization; religious tradition; spiritual tradition
Deadline: February 9, 2018. In your submission, please include:
• A 250 word abstract to describe and clarify the article you would like to contribute. To submit a book review, please select one of the books listed below (or a recent publication of your preference) and explain why it may be important to review.
• 5-6 key words in relation to your abstract
• The professional name(s), institutional affiliation(s), and email address(es) of the author(s).
• FIRE accepts manuscripts in other languages, so long as an English translation of the full manuscript is submitted as well. If you would like to submit in this format, please let us know when you submit the abstract. Note: The English and non-English manuscripts will both be reviewed.
Please send all submissions to W. Y. Alice Chan at alice.chan@mail.mcgill.ca. Please feel free to share this with others in your network as well.
Potential books for review:
Collet, B. A. (2017). Migration, Religion, and Schooling in Liberal Democratic States. London, UK: Routledge. Retrieved from https://www.routledge.com/Migration-Religion-and-Schooling-in-Liberal-Democratic-States/Collet/p/book/9781138651098
Hilton, J. III. (Ed.) (2018). Teaching Religion Using Technology in Higher Education. London, UK: Routledge. Retrieved from https://www.routledge.com/Teaching-Religion-Using-Technology-in-Higher-Education/III/p/book/9781138087224
McGill, J. (2016). Religious Identity and Cultural Negotiation: Toward a Theology of Christian Identity in Migration (American Society of Missiology Monograph Series).Pickwick Publications. Retrieved from https://wipfandstock.com/religious-identity-and-cultural-negotiation.html
Sivasubramaniam, M. & Hayhoe, R. (Eds.). (2017). Religion and Education: Comparative and International Perspectives. Oxford, UK: Symposium Books. Retrieved from http://www.symposium-books.co.uk/bookdetails/101/
If you wish to submit a book review, FIRE can obtain a free copy that will be sent to you for review.
Timeline for issue:
• February 9, 2018 – Interested authors submit abstract to guest editors.
• February 23, 2018 – Guest editors contact authors to confirm acceptance or decline.
• April 30, 2018 – Deadline for authors to submit articles for guest editor review.
• June 30, 2018 – Guest editors return initial manuscript to authors.
• September 1, 2018 – Deadline for authors to resubmit edited papers based on our comments from June. Guest editors to submit manuscript to FIRE on behalf of authors.
Guest editors: W. Y. Alice Chan, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Integrated Studies in Education, McGill University, alice.chan@mail.mcgill.ca Elena Lisovskaya, Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Western Michigan University, elena.lisovskaya@wmich.edu Bob Osburn, Executive Director, Wilberforce Academy, St Paul MN bob@wilberforceacademy.org

Canada Research Chair

Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada has been selected to nominate a prestigious Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in Migration and Integration(https://www.ryerson.ca/research/resources/funding/cerc/) with a one-time investment of $10 million in funding over seven years. We are currently in the active search for a global research leader to nominate for this Chair position.

For details regarding the posting please click here(https://hr.cf.ryerson.ca/ams/faculty/preview.cfm?posting_id=514605). Applications should be emailed to cerc@ryerson.ca and will be accepted until February 25, 2018 at 11:59 p.m.

I would be happy to address any questions you may have on the initiative and our search. You may contact me at cerc@ryerson.ca. Thank you in advance for interest and assistance.

Sincerely yours,

Dayle Ann Levine

Manager, Institutional Projects

Office of the Vice President, Research and Innovation

Ryerson University

 Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration at Ryerson University

Responding to one of the most pressing global issues our generation faces, we are seeking a visionary research leader for the Chair in Migration and Integration to head an internationally recognized research program. The global movement of people – whether it be permanent or temporary, within a country or cross-border, forced or voluntary – is increasingly shaping the political, economic and social processes of the 21st century. Ryerson is well positioned to support the program of a talented researcher who will make important contributions to this ongoing conversation and create solutions that will have a positive impact on the lives of migrants in Canada and abroad.

One of the most significant research awards in Canada and internationally, the CERC program supports and builds the global reputation of Canadian universities and leaders in research and innovation and funds top-tier, world-renowned international researchers and their team to build a robust research program addressing significant challenges.

Ryerson’s Centre for Immigration and Settlement (https://www.ryerson.ca/rcis/) is a leader in immigration studies, exploring migration, integration, as well as refugee and diaspora studies, and has a stellar track-record of creating knowledge that impacts policy and practices. The Chair will be particularly relevant in Ryerson, with its ethnically diverse faculty and student population, and based in Toronto, where immigrants make up more than half the population.

This is an exciting time to be in Canada, in Toronto, and at Ryerson University. Ryerson Universityis on a transformative path as Canada’s leading comprehensive innovation university. Located in the heart of Toronto, one of the world’s most cosmopolitan, culturally and linguistically diverse urban centres, Ryerson’s high quality programs and scholarly, research and creative activities extend beyond the walls of the University. Longstanding partnerships with community, industry, government, and professional practice drive research and innovation that respond to real-world problems.

Dears,

I thought this may be of some interest to some of you:

This piece Why Am I Still Muslim? by Mohammed Hashas, is available open access at:   https://www.criticalmuslim.io/why-am-i-still-muslim/#.WnMbW_woJQI.twitter

In Critical Muslim magazine (UK, editor Ziauddin Sardar), CM 25:2 Values, January 2018
Content of CM 25:2:

Rowan Williams explores Islam, Christianity and pluralism; Mohammed Hashas explains why he is still a Muslim; Maurice Irfan Coles teaches compassion; Shaista Aziz is fed up with everyday bigotry; Tahir Abbas encounters Generation M; Khidr Collective’s ‘other voices’; and poems by Maya Abu Al-Hayyat.
Kind regards,
Mohammed HASHAS, PhD (محمد حصحاص)
Research Fellow
LUISS Guido Carli University, Rome

Call for Papers: Social Science History Association Religion Network

Social Science History Association 2018 Annual Conference

Phoenix, Arizona, November 8-11, 2018

Conference Theme: “Histories of Disadvantage: Meanings, Mechanisms, and Politics”

SUBMISSION DEADLINE IS FEBRUARY 16, 2018

The Religion Network of the Social Science History Association invites proposals for papers, panels, and book sessions for the 43rd annual meeting of the Social Science History Association in Phoenix, Arizona, November 8-11, 2018. We are also looking for volunteers to serve as panel chairs and discussants.

The SSHA is the leading interdisciplinary association for historical research in the US, providing a stimulating venue for explorations of how social processes unfold over time. The Religion Network serves as the home within the organization for scholars interested in religious history, religious mobilization, religious change, and religion’s effect on social and political processes. Our network is interdisciplinary and cross-national in scope, and embraces all scholarship that examines how religion intersects with other social processes in historical perspective.

We encourage the participation of graduate students and recent PhDs as well as more established scholars from a wide range of disciplines and departments. Graduate students are eligible to apply for financial support to attend the annual meeting. Further details about the association, the 2018 annual meeting, and the call for proposals are available on the SSHA website: www.ssha.org.

The deadline for paper and/or panel submissions is February 16, 2018.

We welcome and encourage papers and panel proposals on a wide array of issues related to the historical study of religion and society. While complete panel proposals (consisting of 4-5 individual papers, a chair, and a discussant) are preferred, we also seek out high-quality individual paper submissions. Panels and papers may address the topics below, or any other relevant and related topic examining religion in a historical context:

·      Religion across Boundaries

·      Religion and Populism

·      Religion and Gender

·      Religion and Contemporary Geopolitics

·      Religion and State Formation

·      Secularizations, Secularisms, Secularities

·      Religion and Law

·      Religion and the Arts

·      Religion and Social Movements

·      Religion and Science

·      Religion and Field Theory

Please use the SSHA’s web conference management system to submit your papers and panel proposals. Paper title, brief abstract, and contact information should be submitted at http://prd.sshaconference.org/. Please do not hesitate to contact the Religion Network representatives with any questions, comments, or for help with submissions.

Thank you, and we look forward to a stimulating set of panels at this year’s SSHA meeting.

Ateş Altınordu (atesaltinordu@sabanciuniv.edu)

Sam Nelson (samuel.nelson@mcgill.ca)

Sadia Saeed (ssaeed3@usfca.edu)

Philip Gorski (philip.gorski@yale.edu)

SSHA Religion Network Representatives