Category Archives: Announcements

FINAL REMINDER – Call for Papers/Abstracts: ISA Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion (RC22)

Abstracts due by 30 September, 2017 24:00 GMT.

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/wc2018/webprogrampreliminary/Symposium459.html

XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology

Power, Violence and Justice: Reflections, Responses and Responsibilities

Toronto, Canada, July 15-21, 2018

RESEARCH COMMITTEE 22: SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

Religion, Power, and Resistance: New Ideas for a Divided World

Current environmental, economic, social, and political challenges indicate that people are losing faith in existing power structures and mechanisms for coping with crises. This creates increasingly divided societies, riven by ideological battles for the future of the human and the more than human world. Religion has a place in this picture. Not only is it often a source of divisions; it can also be a source for alternative means of addressing them.

These divisions take new and as yet unclear shapes, which sociologists are only now beginning to comprehend. It is not enough to refer to the struggle between ‘tradition’ and ‘modernity’, terms that dominated sociology through the 1970s. Nor do the tropes ‘colonialism vs. anti-colonialism’ and the ‘clash of civilizations’ adequately explain what is going on. Nor, arguably, does ‘populism vs neo-liberalism’ fully capture such things as the recent clashes between cosmopolitan and anticosmopolitan actors in the major Western democracies. Each of these has a piece of the picture; none of them captures it all.

What is religion’s role in this situation: as a creator of divisions, as a locus of power, and as a ground of resistance?  How does religion influence our divided societies? How is religion influenced in turn?

We invite paper abstract submissions for the following RC22 sessions:

  • Religion and National Identity
  • Religion and Secularity
  • Religion and Non-Violent Social Movements
  • Religion, Gender and Family Violence
  • Religion in the East Asian Public Sphere
  • Religion in the Public Square
  • Social Theory and Religion
  • Religion and Migration: Contrasting First and Second Generations
  • Dynamics of Gender, Religion and Intersectionality
  • Prejudice, Exclusion and Violence in a Transnational World
  • Media and Religious Radicalization: Gatekeeping and the Construction of Extremism
  • Gender, Feminism, and Islam and the West
  • Religious Texts of Diversity Vs Exclusion

We will also be including the following invited sessions in our RC22 program:

  • Presidential Address: The Sociology of Religion in a Post-Colonial Era (Invited Session) Session Organizer: James SPICKARD, University of Redlands, USA
  • Religion and Diversity: An International Study (Invited Session) Session Organizer: Lori BEAMAN, University of Ottawa, Canada
  • Diffused Religion. Beyond Secularization – Author Meets Critic Session (Invited Session) Session Organizer: Roberto CIPRIANI, University Roma Tre, Italy
  • The Case for an Indeterminate Sociological Theory of Religion (Invited Session) Session Organizer: Tak-ling WOO, York University, Canada

The ISA CONFEX website site is now accepting paper abstracts between 25 April and 30 September, 2017 24:00 GMT.

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/wc2018/webprogrampreliminary/Symposium459.html

Please address any questions to the Program Coordinators:

     Anna Halafoff: anna.halafoff@deakin.edu.au

     Sam Han: HanSam@ntu.edu.sg

     Caroline Starkey: C.Starkey@leeds.ac.uk

Announcement: Outstanding Director of the HRH Prince Alwaleed bin Tala

Director of the HRH Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Centre for the Study of Islam in the Contemporary World 
Vacancy Ref: :  039922
 
The University of Edinburgh is seeking to appoint an outstanding Director of the HRH Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Centre for the Study of Islam in the Contemporary World.
 
The HRH Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Centre for the Study of Islam in the Contemporary World (www.alwaleed.ed.ac.uk) is a Centre within the University of Edinburgh, established in 2010, devoted to research, outreach and knowledge transfer, in the field of Islamic Studies. It is part of a network of Centres established by the HRH Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Foundation, currently two in the United States (Harvard and Georgetown), two in the United Kingdom (Edinburgh and Cambridge), and two in the Middle East (the American University of Beirut and the American University in Cairo), which are devoted to the improvement of mutual understanding between the Muslim World and the West. Further details of the Objectives, Staff, and activities of the Edinburgh Alwaleed Centre can be found at www.alwaleed.ed.ac.uk.
 
As Director, and in consultation with Head of College and Head of School and other stakeholders, you will set a strategic vision for the Centre’s development covering research, outreach and impact to raise the Centre’s international profile, build research and teaching partnerships across the University, and creatively engage with a broad range of external individuals and organisations.
 
A successful track record of leadership, strong intellectual credentials, and the ability to command credibility amongst senior figures in academia and beyond is essential. A successful candidate for this position will be appointed, if suitably qualified and as appropriate, to a Chair at the University at the same time.
 
For a confidential discussion, please contact Professor Jeremy Robbins, Head of School, Literatures, Languages and Cultures – Tel: +44 (0)131 650 3638.
 
This is a full time, open ended position based on 35 hours each week. Salary will be negotiable depending on track record and experience.
 
Closing date: 5pm (GMT) Wednesday 14th June 2017.
 
Further information and details on how to apply can be found at the following link:https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=039922

Book Announcement: Religions, Nations, and Transnationalism in Multiple Modernities


Announcement: Academic Khōjā Studies Listserv

The Western Indian Ocean Studies Program at Florida International University in Miami is pleased to announce the launch of its academic Khōjā Studies Listserv. Khōjā Studies is an interdisciplinary field of study that connects religious studies, diaspora studies, and postcolonial studies to South Asian and African area studies within the framework of the Western Indian Ocean to answer historical questions of aesthetics, authority, identity, and the circulation of ideas across the littoral.

The listserv is particularly sensitive to providing full-text and PDFs of articles for scholars in the Global South and providing a platform for the expression of emic perspectives of the communities researched. Most importantly, what drives the listserv is intellectual curiosity that crosses disciplinary boundaries.

To sign up, please visit https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/khojastudies

For more information on Western Indian Ocean Studies at FIU, please visit http://khoja.fiu.edu/

Publishing announcement: Migration and Society

Journal published by Berghahn

Migration is at the heart of the transformation of societies and communities and touches the lives of people across the globe. Migration and Society is a new interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal advancing debate about emergent trends in all types of migration. We invite work that situates migration in a wider historical and societal context, including attention to experiences and representations of migration, critical theoretical perspectives on migration, and the social, cultural, and legal embeddedness of migration. Global in its scope, we particularly encourage scholarship from and about the global South as well as the North.
Migration and Society addresses both dynamics and drivers of migration; processes of settlement and integration; and transnational practices and diaspora formation. We publish theoretically informed and empirically based articles of the highest quality, especially encouraging work that interrogates and transcends the boundaries between the social sciences and the arts and humanities.
We also welcome articles that reflect on the complexities of both studying and teaching migration, as well as pieces that focus on the relationship between scholarship and the policies and politics of migration.
Submissions are welcome for consideration in one of the five journal sections:
o   Research Articles: Each issue will include articles (max. 8,000 words) addressing a key theme, in addition to a range of other migration-and-society related articles
o   The People & Places section consists of shorter pieces (2,000-4,000 words), including notes from the field, ‘migrant voices’, and interviews with scholars, practitioners, and policymakers
o   The Reflections section invites critical reflections (max. 5,000 words) on migration research and teaching
o   The Creative Encounters section invites poetry, shorter prose pieces, photo essays, and other  engagements with migration
o   Each issue concludes with a Book Reviews section (800 words for single book reviews, 13-1400 words for reviews of two books, 15-1600 words for three books).
 
Migration and Society is edited by Mette Louise Berg (UCL) and Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (UCL).
 
Inaugural issue (publication August 2018)
Hospitality and hostility towards migrants: global perspectives
Recent years have seen an unprecedented scale of global forced migration. Millions of people have fled conflicts and mass human rights violations as well as poverty and persecution. Across sites of transit and settlement migrants have been met by a combination of hospitality and hostility.
For the inaugural issue of Migration and Society, we welcome theoretically and empirically informed contributions that help us develop a more nuanced understanding of the complex responses and experiences of hospitality and hostility around the world and in different historical contexts. We invite contributions that offer critical analyses of the following questions:
1.      How, and why, have different actors responded to the actual, prospective, and imagined arrival of migrants across time and space?
2.      How have migrants and refugees experienced and responded to different, and at times overlapping, processes of hospitality and hostility in sites of transit and settlement?
3.      What are the politics and the poetics of hospitality and hostility towards migrants in different spaces?
4.      As ‘new’ migrants join established diasporas and transnational communities, how have ‘locals’ and ‘established’ migrants and refugees responded to ‘newly’ displaced people?
5.      How, why, and with what effects have diverse media represented processes of migration? Who has been rendered (hyper)visible and audible, and/or invisible, inaudible, and silenced in different representations of migration?
6.      What are the historic resonances, continuities, and discontinuities of contemporary dynamics of hospitality and hostility towards migrants?
We especially welcome articles that examine – and interrogate – the applicability of the concepts of hospitality and hostility in different settings; and that explore the relationship between these and other concepts, including cosmopolitanism, welcome, conviviality, neighbourliness, and solidarity, from the perspective of the global South as well as the North.
 
Deadline for submitting articles for inclusion in issue 1: 30 September 2017.
 

Book Announcement: Let them not return

 Publication of the edited volume LET THEM NOT RETURN: Sayfo – The Genocide against the Assyrian, Syriac and Chaldean Christians in the Ottoman Empire.  In May the publisher offers it at a 50% discount (see attached code). Link to table of contents: http://www.berghahnbooks.com/title/GauntLet
 
See for my latest article about the same theme in Genocide Studies International: http://www.utpjournals.press/doi/abs/10.3138/gsi.10.2.04 
‘What Could Not Be Written: A Study of the Oral Transmission of Sayfo Genocide Memory Among Assyrians’.
 
 
 

Call for Abstracts: Routledge International Handbook of Religion in Global Society

Routledge International Handbook ofReligion in Global Society

Eds. Jayeel Serrano Cornelio (Ateneo de Manila), François Gauthier (Université de Fribourg), Tuomas Martikainen (Migration Institute of Finland) and Linda Woodhead (Lancaster University)

 

This is a Call for Abstracts to contribute to theRoutledge International Handbook of Religion in Global Society (target publication: 2018).  We are particularly interested in contributions from early career scholars from around the world.

The study of religion is at a turning point, along with religion itself. This book will capitalise on the emergence of a new paradigm, which considers religion in the 21st century as globally interconnected and mediated by new geopolitical and market logics.

 

This volume will showcase new approaches toreligion, which work across boundaries of religioustradition, academic discipline, and region.

Please consider the following rationale for your proposed papers.

You may send your proposed title, abstract (no more than 500 words), name, and affiliation to Jayeel Cornelio (jcornelio@ateneo.edu) by July 15, 2017.

RATIONALE

The volume understands changes in religion since the 1980s as shaped by wider socio-political-cultural changes of the period.  The shift is from one dominated by modernist national-statist formations and alliances to one in which forces, institutions and ideologies of neoliberalism, consumerism, migration, and mediatisation have become major structuring vectors.  But at the same time we also see a pushback from anti-globalisation movements of right and left and a return to the nation and/or more locally based identities. Growing environmental concern and the concept of the Anthropocene add an additional element.   

This is how the handbook characterizes the contemporary state of global society.  As a result, ‘soft power’, including religion and competing forms of secularity and ‘no religion’, come to be central in new geopolitical configurations and contestations of power.  Recognizing these new configurations, this handbook will interrogate the past, present and futures of religion in global society. 

The handbook welcomes contributions approaching religion at different levels of society (whether local, regional, national, transnational) — the macro, meso and micro.  For example, chapters can focus on internal transformations that occur within religious institutions; on the changing nature of practices, belief, adherence, piety and devotion among individuals; or the changing role of religious organizations with respect to politics, the economy and other social institutions.  Some contributions may discuss how religious movements are taking on global issues. Others will take a theoretical perspective and try to make sense of the current situation, even when this requires rethinking existing theories and concepts.

The handbook is multidisciplinary in approach and organized according to the following themes.  We invite contributions from scholars around the world, particularly those who are in their early careers.  Our aim is to make this handbook the first to go beyond Western-centric appraisals, and present a truly global portrait. Contributions dealing with dynamics around the world are therefore solicited.

The following topics are indicative only, and will change in response to submissions. 

A.  CONTEXT

1.  Introduction: a new approach   

2.  Theorising religion in a global context 

3.  Global demographics of religion

4.  Globalization and the national   

5.  Rethinking religious traditions  

6.  Authority and individualization

B.  INDIVIDUALS, IDENTITY, and INTIMACIES

7.  Generations         

8.  Religion, sex, family and gender

9.  Intimacy   

10.  Global classes    

11.  Religion and identities

C.  MARKETS, MEDIA, and CULTURES

12.  Branding religion          

13.  Merchandising religion

14.  Digital religion   

15.  Popular culture 

16.  Religion and fashion

D.  MOBILITY AND MIGRATION

13.  International migration and mobility 

14.  Missionaries and traveling gurus       

15.  Transnationalism and diasporas        

16.  Migrant religious settlements 

17.  Pilgrimage and religious tourism

E.  COMMUNITIES and MOVEMENTS

18.  Moderates versus fundamentalists    

19.  The shape of religious organizations  

20.  Networks and virtual communities    

21. Religious spectacle, pilgrimage and festivals  

22.  Global subcultures        

23.  Religion and science

 

F.  POLITICS, THE STATE and INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

24.  Secularism and the post-secular         

25.  State governance of religion    

26.  Religion and civil society          

27.  Radicalization, securitization and terrorism  

28.  Religion and law           

29.  Religion and supranational organizations     

30.  Religion and populism

G.  GOVERNANCE AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS

31.  Governance of religious diversity       

32.  Religion and education

33.  Religious freedom         

34.  Religion and development       

35.  Religion, peace and violence    

36.  Religion in international relations      

37.  Religion and the environment