Category Archives: Announcements

[Scripta] New Issue Published

Dear Colleagues

We are happy to announce the publication of: Scripta Instituti Donneriani Aboensis Vol. 28 (2018)

Theme: The Ethnic and Religious Future of Europe

Available in open access at: https://journal.fi/scripta

The current issue consists of articles based on presentations given at the conference with the same name arranged in Turku/Åbo, Finland in June, 2017.

Scripta is published by the Donner Institute in Åbo, Finland. Its purpose is to publish current research on religion and culture and to offer a platform for scholarly co-operation and debate within the field. The articles have been selected on the basis of peer-review.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

Ruth Illman
The Donner Institute

***

Table of Content (Vol. 28)

EDITORIAL

The ethnic and religious future of Europe

RUTH ILLMAN, PETER NYNÄS, TUOMAS MARTIKAINEN

ARTICLES

The demographic factors that make Islam the world’s fastest-growing major religious group

CONRAD HACKETT, MICHAEL LIPKA

The NPW framework in future-oriented studies of cultural agency

MATTI KAMPPINEN

Legitimacy for some

FREDRIK PORTIN

Humanity and hospitality

RENÉ DAUSNER

Islam’s increased visibility in the European public sphere

DIDEM DOGANYILMAZ DUMAN

A critical discourse analysis of the media coverage of the migration crisis in Poland

JOANNA KROTOFIL, DOMINIKA MOTAK

Reconsidering the modern nation state in the Anthropocene

WARDAH ALKATIRI

From Yidishe khasene to civil marriage

MERCÉDESZ CZIMBALMOS

Income inequality and religion globally 1970–2050

JOSE NAVARRO, VEGARD SKIRBEKK

 

Chapter: Does European Islam Think? By Mohammed Hashas 2018

This may interest some of you.
 

“Does European Islam Think?” By Mohammed Hashas

Abstract:
In this chapter I present two major divergent lines of thought that read European Islam differently, though this difference has hardly been problematised and remarked before, nor has it been put face to face in a scholarly debate. This chapter then presents the views of two major scholars of Islam and Muslims in Europe: those of the French scholar Olivier Roy, and those of the Danish scholar Jørgen S. Nielsen. My own reading of European Islam makes me stand with the latter on his position: European Muslims are making their own theology; it is a pluralist theology in progress. It may even be inspiring to the Arab-Islamic world.
Mohammed Hashas, “Does European Islam Think?” In Niels Valdemar Vinding, Egdūnas Račius, and Jörn Thielmann, eds., Exploring the Multitude of Muslims in Europe: Essays in Honour of Jørgen S. Nielsen (Brill, 2018), pp. 35-49.
The chapter is attached as pdf

Studies in Honor of Professor Saba Mahmood

Rethinking Politics and Religion: Studies in Honor of Professor Saba Mahmood

                                               Special issue of Sociology of Islam

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/22131418

https://brill.com/view/journals/soi/soi-overview.xml

On the sad news of the passing of Saba Mahmood, the editorial board of the journal Sociology of Islam has decided to organize a special issue to honor the work and legacy of our distinguished colleague for the study of global politics and religion.

Saba Mahmood’s anthropological work shifted debates on secularism and religion, gender and politics, the rights of religious minorities, and the impact of colonialism in the Middle East. Her conceptual engagement with these pertinent social and political issues, however, has opened up broader questions about the politics of religious difference in a secular age beyond the Middle East and Muslim majority countries. This special issue of Sociology of Islam intends to bring to the fore the scope of these contributions in order to assess the cross-disciplinary and transregional magnitude of her work. The editorial board calls for papers on the following and related subjects in the work of Saba Mahmood:

–          Agency and submission;

–          Body/Embodiment;

–          Citizenship;

–          Ethics;

–          Feminist Theory;

–          Gender;

–          Hermeneutics;

–          Law and the State;

–          Postcolonialism/Postcoloniality;

–          Religious freedom;

–          Religious difference;

–          Secularism/Secularity;

–          Sovereignty;

–          Subject formation;

–          The minority condition.

If you are interested in contributing to this special issue, please send a 500-word abstract to Sultan Doughan (sultan_doughan@berkeley.edu) and Jean-Michel Landry (jean-michel.landry@mcgill.ca) by 30 April 2018. We acknowledge receipt of all emails and will reply to all. If you do not receive a reply, please resend your abstract. Please include the following in your email:

–          Author name;

–          Affiliation;

–          email address;

–          abstract in Word format;

–          a short CV.

Acceptance notices will be sent by 15 May 2018. Full articles are due 30 September 2018. The special issue will come out in early 2019 (2019/2). All articles must follow the guidelines provided in the attachment to this email.

The Impact of Law on Transnational Families’ Staying, Moving and Settling

For the EASA2018 conference: Staying, Moving, Settling (Stockholm August 14-17) we will convene a panel entitled

The Impact of Law on Transnational Families’ Staying, Moving and Settling.

Law shapes people’s decisions to stay, move, or settle. Institutions interpret international treaties and domestic legislation producing dynamic categories of deserving and undeserving migrants. Transnational families use, avoid or subvert this law to facilitate migration and maintain kinship.

To propose a paper please use the EASA conference website: https://nomadit.co.uk/easa/easa2018/conferencesuite.php/panels/6592

Deadline for paper proposals is April 9

Long abstract

Law and routine legal practice fundamentally shape people’s attitudes towards staying in a country, their choices about moving overseas, and their options for settling abroad.

Individual migrants’ interactions with bureaucrats, lawyers, advocacy organizations, and judges produce dynamic categories of deserving and undeserving migrants. The resulting legal statuses create, reunite or break transnational families, reconfiguring kin relations across borders.

This panel will bring together empirical research on the impact that family, citizenship and immigration, criminal, and human rights and refugee law has on family ties within differently positioned transnational families. Research sites might include CSOs, lawyers, government bureaucracies and families in any transnational context. We are interested in research focusing on either privileged or disadvantaged transnational family members; intersectional analyses of the legal production of categories of deserving and undeserving migrant kin; and critical enquiries into the concept of the transnational family.

Papers could discuss:

  • How migrants’ sources and levels of legal knowledge shape their use, avoidance or subversion of the law;
  • The “legal work” required to maintain family ties across borders;
  • The impact of international human rights law (eg. the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child) in lived experiences of attempting to reunite and settle;
  • The role of law breaking in sustaining the transnational family;
  • When law allowing or preventing migration contributes to power relations within transnational families;
  • The successes and failures of lobbying towards changing legal categorisations relevant to transnational families;
  • How transnational families’ experiences reflect, or do not, reflect political and public discourse about them.

Convenors

·         Jessica Carlisle (Newman University) 

·         Iris Sportel (Radboud University Nijmegen)

Kind regards,

Iris Sportel

 
dr. Iris Sportel
Institute for Sociology of Law/ Centre for Migration Law
Radboud University Nijmegen

Article on Gender in the Islamic Republic of Iran

The following article which has just been published might be of research interest of some scholars in this list:
 
Foroutan, Y. (2018), Formation of Gender Identity in the Islamic Republic of Iran: Does Educational Institution Matter?, Journal of Beliefs & Values, Vol. 39, Issue 2. 
 
With kind Regards,
Yaghoob.

Shanghai University David Musto Center for Drug Policy Studies: Fellowship and MA/PhD Scholarship

Shanghai University David Musto Center for Drug Policy Studies would like to invite scholars who are interested in collaboration and students who would like to apply for PhD. or MA program at Shanghai University.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Professor Zhang Yongan zhangyongan@shu.edu.cn

Best,

Tugrul Keskin

Associate Professor

Shanghai University

Email: tugrulkeskin@t.shu.edu.cn

tugrulkeskin@protonmail.com

China: 86+15000-465734

Turkey Cell: (90) 533-607-8465

Editor of Sociology of Islam Journal (Brill)

http://www.brill.nl/sociology-islam

Region Editor of Critical Sociology (Middle East and North Africa)

http://crs.sagepub.com/

Canada Research Chair

Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada has been selected to nominate a prestigious Canada Excellence Research Chair (CERC) in Migration and Integration(https://www.ryerson.ca/research/resources/funding/cerc/) with a one-time investment of $10 million in funding over seven years. We are currently in the active search for a global research leader to nominate for this Chair position.

For details regarding the posting please click here(https://hr.cf.ryerson.ca/ams/faculty/preview.cfm?posting_id=514605). Applications should be emailed to cerc@ryerson.ca and will be accepted until February 25, 2018 at 11:59 p.m.

I would be happy to address any questions you may have on the initiative and our search. You may contact me at cerc@ryerson.ca. Thank you in advance for interest and assistance.

Sincerely yours,

Dayle Ann Levine

Manager, Institutional Projects

Office of the Vice President, Research and Innovation

Ryerson University

 Canada Excellence Research Chair in Migration and Integration at Ryerson University

Responding to one of the most pressing global issues our generation faces, we are seeking a visionary research leader for the Chair in Migration and Integration to head an internationally recognized research program. The global movement of people – whether it be permanent or temporary, within a country or cross-border, forced or voluntary – is increasingly shaping the political, economic and social processes of the 21st century. Ryerson is well positioned to support the program of a talented researcher who will make important contributions to this ongoing conversation and create solutions that will have a positive impact on the lives of migrants in Canada and abroad.

One of the most significant research awards in Canada and internationally, the CERC program supports and builds the global reputation of Canadian universities and leaders in research and innovation and funds top-tier, world-renowned international researchers and their team to build a robust research program addressing significant challenges.

Ryerson’s Centre for Immigration and Settlement (https://www.ryerson.ca/rcis/) is a leader in immigration studies, exploring migration, integration, as well as refugee and diaspora studies, and has a stellar track-record of creating knowledge that impacts policy and practices. The Chair will be particularly relevant in Ryerson, with its ethnically diverse faculty and student population, and based in Toronto, where immigrants make up more than half the population.

This is an exciting time to be in Canada, in Toronto, and at Ryerson University. Ryerson Universityis on a transformative path as Canada’s leading comprehensive innovation university. Located in the heart of Toronto, one of the world’s most cosmopolitan, culturally and linguistically diverse urban centres, Ryerson’s high quality programs and scholarly, research and creative activities extend beyond the walls of the University. Longstanding partnerships with community, industry, government, and professional practice drive research and innovation that respond to real-world problems.

Dears,

I thought this may be of some interest to some of you:

This piece Why Am I Still Muslim? by Mohammed Hashas, is available open access at:   https://www.criticalmuslim.io/why-am-i-still-muslim/#.WnMbW_woJQI.twitter

In Critical Muslim magazine (UK, editor Ziauddin Sardar), CM 25:2 Values, January 2018
Content of CM 25:2:

Rowan Williams explores Islam, Christianity and pluralism; Mohammed Hashas explains why he is still a Muslim; Maurice Irfan Coles teaches compassion; Shaista Aziz is fed up with everyday bigotry; Tahir Abbas encounters Generation M; Khidr Collective’s ‘other voices’; and poems by Maya Abu Al-Hayyat.
Kind regards,
Mohammed HASHAS, PhD (محمد حصحاص)
Research Fellow
LUISS Guido Carli University, Rome

PhD Studentships for Islamic Civilisation or Muslims in Europe for a September 2018

Dear Colleagues,

The Alwaleed Centre for the Study of Islam in the Contemporary World at the University of Edinburgh is offering two fully-funded PhD Studentships in either Islamic Civilisation or Muslims in Europe for a September 2018 start.

Full details including the application procedure can be found here: https://tinyurl.com/alwaleedcentrephd

Please circulate to anyone who you feel maybe interested. Any informal enquiries can be directed to the Centre’s Director, Professor Jaakko Hameen-Anttila: j.hameen-anttila@ed.ac.uk.

With very best wishes,

The Alwaleed Centre team

–University of Edinburgh

16 George Square

Edinburgh

EH8 9LD

www.alwaleed.ed.ac.uk

@alwaleed_centre

FINAL REMINDER – Call for Papers/Abstracts: ISA Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion (RC22)

Abstracts due by 30 September, 2017 24:00 GMT.

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/wc2018/webprogrampreliminary/Symposium459.html

XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology

Power, Violence and Justice: Reflections, Responses and Responsibilities

Toronto, Canada, July 15-21, 2018

RESEARCH COMMITTEE 22: SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

Religion, Power, and Resistance: New Ideas for a Divided World

Current environmental, economic, social, and political challenges indicate that people are losing faith in existing power structures and mechanisms for coping with crises. This creates increasingly divided societies, riven by ideological battles for the future of the human and the more than human world. Religion has a place in this picture. Not only is it often a source of divisions; it can also be a source for alternative means of addressing them.

These divisions take new and as yet unclear shapes, which sociologists are only now beginning to comprehend. It is not enough to refer to the struggle between ‘tradition’ and ‘modernity’, terms that dominated sociology through the 1970s. Nor do the tropes ‘colonialism vs. anti-colonialism’ and the ‘clash of civilizations’ adequately explain what is going on. Nor, arguably, does ‘populism vs neo-liberalism’ fully capture such things as the recent clashes between cosmopolitan and anticosmopolitan actors in the major Western democracies. Each of these has a piece of the picture; none of them captures it all.

What is religion’s role in this situation: as a creator of divisions, as a locus of power, and as a ground of resistance?  How does religion influence our divided societies? How is religion influenced in turn?

We invite paper abstract submissions for the following RC22 sessions:

  • Religion and National Identity
  • Religion and Secularity
  • Religion and Non-Violent Social Movements
  • Religion, Gender and Family Violence
  • Religion in the East Asian Public Sphere
  • Religion in the Public Square
  • Social Theory and Religion
  • Religion and Migration: Contrasting First and Second Generations
  • Dynamics of Gender, Religion and Intersectionality
  • Prejudice, Exclusion and Violence in a Transnational World
  • Media and Religious Radicalization: Gatekeeping and the Construction of Extremism
  • Gender, Feminism, and Islam and the West
  • Religious Texts of Diversity Vs Exclusion

We will also be including the following invited sessions in our RC22 program:

  • Presidential Address: The Sociology of Religion in a Post-Colonial Era (Invited Session) Session Organizer: James SPICKARD, University of Redlands, USA
  • Religion and Diversity: An International Study (Invited Session) Session Organizer: Lori BEAMAN, University of Ottawa, Canada
  • Diffused Religion. Beyond Secularization – Author Meets Critic Session (Invited Session) Session Organizer: Roberto CIPRIANI, University Roma Tre, Italy
  • The Case for an Indeterminate Sociological Theory of Religion (Invited Session) Session Organizer: Tak-ling WOO, York University, Canada

The ISA CONFEX website site is now accepting paper abstracts between 25 April and 30 September, 2017 24:00 GMT.

https://isaconf.confex.com/isaconf/wc2018/webprogrampreliminary/Symposium459.html

Please address any questions to the Program Coordinators:

     Anna Halafoff: anna.halafoff@deakin.edu.au

     Sam Han: HanSam@ntu.edu.sg

     Caroline Starkey: C.Starkey@leeds.ac.uk