Category Archives: Events

Conference Call for Papers Conference: ‘Religion Matters’

Conference: ‘Religion Matters’: Celebrating the Work of Professor Peter Lineham

Dates: Monday 3 and Tuesday 4 December 2018
Location: Massey University (Albany Campus)

At the end of 2018 Professor Peter Lineham will ‘retire’ after a lifetime of service and employment as an historian at Massey University. Over that time Peter has made exceptional contributions on many fronts, perhaps most notably through enriching scholarly and public understanding of religion and the history of Aotearoa New Zealand. In this respect, his many writings, conference papers, radio and TV interviews, and his influence on countless students and thesis writers all bear testimony to a remarkable impact and legacy. Peter is best known as an historian of religion. Yet his work has always been characterised by an extraordinary range – addressing diverse traditions, historical and contemporary concerns, and issues extending from print culture to politics, sectarianism to sport, and welfare to demographic change. A consistent thread has been to examine, through bold arguments and in more intimate detail, how and why ‘religion matters’; and to tease out the interwoven dimensions of religion, society and culture, whether in Aotearoa New Zealand, our region, or in a wider global perspective. Peter has also consistently sought to provoke curiosity and spark healthy debate, typically with a splash of sparkle and fun.

‘Religion Matters’ seeks to honour Peter and his contributions through a dedicated conference, exploring this theme in the context of New Zealand and further afield. This two-day event will be based at Massey University’s Albany campus. It will combine lively academic examinations of the ‘Religion Matters’ theme, a celebration dinner, and opportunity for colleagues and connections of Peter to interact together and with him.

The keynote speaker is Dr Meredith Lake, author of the recently-published and already acclaimed volume The Bible in Australia: A Cultural History (New South Books, 2018); see further https://www.meredithlake.com/meet-meredith . Professor Michael Belgrave and the Rev. Dr Allan Davidson will directly address Peter’s academic career and public contribution. Peter will also have a right of reply.

Therefore, we invite offers of papers from historians and others that address the conference theme, ‘Religion Matters’, in relation to New Zealand or other contexts. In keeping with Peter’s wide interests, we anticipate that papers will cover a range of relevant approaches and issues, including critique of the conference theme.

Paper proposals should be sent by email to Dr Hugh Morrison (hugh.morrison@otago.ac.nz ) in the form of a 200 word (maximum) abstract, with a paragraph outlining academic or professional background.

All proposals need to be received by Friday 10 August, 2018. Accepted papers will be notified by Friday 7 September.

Sponsored by the Religious History Association of Aotearoa New Zealand and the School of Humanities, Massey University

News and Events Reposted from AASR (May/June, 2018)

Here is a set of events, updates, and conferences/calls-for-papers reposted from the website of the Australian Association for the Study of Religion (https://www.aasr.org.au/mayjune/)

Events:

Updates:

Conferences / call for papers:

Conference ‘Religion and Culture in Conflict and Peace’

Good afternoon,

I’d like to share with you the forthcoming conference ‘Religion and Culture in Conflict and Peace’ organised by the centre of Religion Reconciliation and Peace at the University of Winchester, 20-21 June 2018, I think the programme may be of interest to you. We’d be most grateful if you could share this information with anyone you know who could be interested.

Key speakers include Mohammed Abu-nimer and Susan Hayward. As well as some fascinating papers looking at conflicts from around the world, we have also built in a history walk of the City of Winchester.

More information and booking via the conference website:https://www.winchesterpeaceconference.com/

With best wishes,

Rebecca Bellamy

Centre Coordinator & Partnerships Officer

On part-time secondment to the European Council of Religious Leaders

Winchester Centre of Religion, Reconciliation and Peace (WCRRP)

Religion as Political Communication: A Symposium

Loughborough University’s Centre for Research in Communication and Culture is organising an event on Religion as Political Communication on 7th June 2018. There will be four speakers (see programme below). You are all welcome to attend. The event is free with refreshments provided, but please book your place in advance (via the link below) for catering purpose: 

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/research/crcc/events/eventslist/religion-as-political-communication.html

Religion as Political Communication: A Symposium

10:00 – 16:00, 7th June 2018

Religion is communicated politically in multiple ways: by religious institutions and individuals, by governments with different approaches to religion, via various artistic and cultural expressions, by secular news media, and via digital platforms and communities (Lundby 2017). The types and contents of politically communicated religion are diverse and complex, ranging from the Church of England’s conservative stance on marriage as reserved for heterosexual couples, French lawmakers interpreting religious symbols such as the veil as ‘too political’, the West-End musical success ‘The Book of Mormon’, terrorist acts of violence committed in the name of religion, to representations of ‘Muslims’ as a non-diversified group. Religion can communicate political stances in both direct and indirect ways, such as when drawings of the Prophet Mohammad are considered as unacceptably irreverent expressions of free speech, or when specific positions on abortion, creationism, stem-cell research and euthanasia are inferred when someone declares their stance as ‘religious’. In this symposium, internationally leading scholars on religion and politics are invited to address and debate religion as political communication.

Programme

10:00 Welcome and introductions

10:15 Dr Elizabeth Poole (Keele University): Contesting #stopislam: Political frictions and appropriation in online spaces

10:45 Professor Jolyon Mitchell ((University of Edinburg): The Ambivalent Role of Religion and the Media Arts as Political Communication in Israel /Palestine

11:15 Q & A session

11:45 Lunch and networking

13:00 Dr Jasjit Singh (University of Leeds): The construction of ‘Sikh radicalisation’ in Britain

13:30 Professor Mia Løvheim (Uppsala University, Sweden): Religion, mediatization and a changing political landscape

14:00 Q & A

14:30 Coffee break and networking

15:00 Roundtable discussion

15:45 End of programme

Symposium organisers: Dr Line Nyhagen (Social Sciences), Dr Alexandre Christoyannopoulos (Politics, History and International Relations), PhD student Xinan Li (Social Sciences), Loughborough University.

For speakers’ abstracts, please see: 

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/research/crcc/events/eventslist/religion-as-political-communication.html

Conférence: L’influence étatsunienne sur le droit canadien des religions – 28 mars 2018

Le cycle de conférences du Centre de recherche Société, Droit et Religions de l’Université de Sherbrooke (SoDRUS) se poursuit. Nous vous invitons à notre dernière conférence publique de cette session qui aura lieu le mercredi 28 mars 2018.

L’influence étatsunienne sur le droit canadien des religions

Date : Le mercredi 28 mars 2018

Heure : De 12 h 00 à 13 h 30

Lieu : Campus principal de Sherbrooke, Faculté de droit, local A9-162

Cette conférence sera présentée par Stéphane Bernatchez, professeur titulaire à la Faculté de droit de l’Université de Sherbrooke.

Pour plus d’information sur la conférence, visitez la page suivante : https://www.usherbrooke.ca/sodrus/index.php?id=1251&user_udesnewsdisplay_pi4%5Bitem%5D=35377

Conférences: La nation, la laïcité et le pluralisme religieux

Le cycle de conférences du Centre de recherche Société, Droit et Religions de l’Université de Sherbrooke (SoDRUS) se poursuit. Nous vous invitons à une conférence publique qui aura lieu le mercredi 7 mars 2018. Intitulée La nation, la laïcité et le pluralisme religieux, cette conférence sera présentée par Michel Seymour, professeur titulaire au département de philosophie de l’Université de Montréal.

 La nation, la laïcité et le pluralisme religieux

Date : Le mercredi 7 mars 2018
Heure : De 12 h 00 à 13 h 30
Lieu : Campus principal de Sherbrooke, Faculté de droit, local A9-162

Pour plus d’information sur la conférence, visitez la page suivante :
https://www.usherbrooke.ca/sodrus/accueil/evenements/evenements-details/e/35376/  

Populist Politics & the Minority Voice: British Muslims, Extremisms & Inclusion

A one-day Muslims in Britain Research Network (MBRN) conference organised in partnership with the Department of Theology and Religious Studies, King’s College London (KCL), University of London

19 April 2018

Register at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/populist-politics-the-minority-voice-british-muslims-extremisms-inclusion-tickets-42902695116

Our hosts King’s College have generously provided financial support for the event which means we are able to keep the costs for registration down to £15 for general admission and £10 for PhD students and unwaged members (plus booking fee).

Themes include:

  • Muslim activism and populist politics;
  • New media, populism and the representation of Muslims and other minorities;
  • Recognising, opposing and offering alternatives to anti-Semitism, Islamophobia and other extremisms;
  • British Muslims and national identity after Brexit;
  • Challenges to, and for, principles of tolerance, free speech and accommodation.

Plenary speakers

Narzanin Massoumi, University of Exeter & editor, What is Islamophobia?
Aaron Winter, University of East London
David Feldman, Director, Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism

More TBC…

Additional speakers

Reza Gholami, University of Birmingham
Khadijah Elshayyal, University of Edinburgh
Mirjam Aeschbach, University of Zurich
Shanon Shah, Critical Muslim
Ajmal Hussain, University of Manchester
Laura Jones, Cardiff University
Waqas Tufail, Leeds Beckett University
Gillian Kennedy, King’s College London
Kristin Henrard, ESL, Rotterdam
Ayesha Chowdhury, Leeds Becket University
Laurens de Rooij, University of Cape Town

Conference outline

Across Europe and North America populist parties and leaders have surged in recent years, with figures such as Donald Trump and Andrej Babiš and parties such as UKIP and Alternative für Deutschland making significant electoral gains. Although different in important respects, these movements share certain themes, such as emphasis on national self-interest and hostility toward international co-operation, liberal political norms and established news media. In almost all cases this desire to reassert national identity has also involved renewed hostility toward ethnic and religious minorities – especially Jewish and Muslim minorities – as well as toward any frameworks of liberal accommodation that have allowed minorities to participate in public life on an equal footing. In the UK, this was evident in the referendum on European Union membership in 2016, which not only destabilised previously taken-for-granted political and legal frameworks but also contributed to a sustained rise in hate crime, anti-immigration rhetoric and Islamophobia.

This one-day conference on ‘Populist politics and the minority voice’ will discuss the effects of these changes on British Muslims, and how the concerns of British Muslims relate to those of other minority groups as well as wider debates about the future of liberal states, free speech and ‘fake news’. Since at least the 1970s, British Muslims – as a group and alongside other minorities – have been involved in a struggle for rights, for media and political representation and for recognition. What might these struggles look like in the future? What is the future of British Muslim identity, post-Brexit? How might rights and legal accommodations be affected by withdrawal from the EU? How do concerns about rising Islamophobia intersect with concerns about resurgent anti-Semitism and far-right and populist movements? How should debates about Muslims and the media proceed in an era of ‘fake news’? How can standards of debate about minorities be preserved and what can higher education and Muslim institutions contribute?

Lecture/Event: “Is God Really Dead? Why Belief Matters”, Professor Eileen Barker

Monday 12 February 2018, 6.30-8pm
London School of Economics, Old Theatre, Old Building
Hosted by the Department of Sociology

  • Speaker: Professor Eileen Barker, Professor Emeritus of Sociology at LSE with Special Reference to the Study of Religion.
  • Respondent: Professor Conor Gearty, Professor of Human Rights Law at LSE
  • Chair: Professor Nigel Dodd, Professor of Sociology, LSE

Thirty years after founding INFORM, the information network on religious movements, Eileen Barker argues that the sociology of religion still has an important role in “knowing the causes of things”.

This event will celebrate Eileen’s work over the past 30 years. A celebratory drinks reception
will follow the lecture.

This event is free and open to all.
Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

More information at: http://www.lse.ac.uk/Events/2018/02/20180212t1830vOT/is-god-really-dead

Poster for “Is God Really Dead?”, with Prof. Eileen Barker

Public lecture: “La nation, la laïcité et le pluralisme religieux”, Wednesday, January 24th, University of Sherbrook

La nation, la laïcité et le pluralisme religieux

Date : Le mercredi 24 janvier 2018

Heure : De 12 h 00 à 13 h 30

Lieu : Campus principal de Sherbrooke, Faculté de droit, local A9-162

Cette conférence sera présentée par Michel Seymour, professeur titulaire au département de philosophie de l’Université de Montréal.

Pour plus d’information sur la conférence, visitez la page suivante :https://www.usherbrooke.ca/sodrus/accueil/evenements/evenements-details/e/35376/

Center for Research on Religion & Society 10 year anniversary celebration (Uppsala University)

Välkommen till samtal om aktuell religionsforskning! Tisdag 23 januari 2018 kl 13-17

Campus Engelska Parken, Uppsala universitet,
Thunbergsvägen 3C,
Uppsala Centrum för forskning om Religion och Samhälle (CRS) har flyttat in i nya lokaler på Campus Engelska parken i Uppsala och bjuder in till samtal med både nya och etablerade samverkanspartners.

Vi vill presentera CRS multidisciplinära forskning och hur den kan möta de behov som finns hos myndigheter, organisationer och företag i Sverige i fråga om kunskap om religion och värderingar i Sverige idag. Vi bjuder på inslag från forskning som har bedrivits under vårt 10- åriga forskningsprogram ’The Impact of Religion: Challenges for Society, Law and Democracy’ samt nya initiativ där forskning pågår. Det kan handla om hur religion på nya sätt är närvarande i olika former av media och på arbetsplatser, väcker nya frågor inom rättsväsendet och sjukvården, reser nya utmaningar för lärare inom skola och förskola, tar nya former i det civila samhället och tar nya uttryck för individer genom livet.

Vi vill ta tillfället i akt att höra vilka frågor inom detta område som är mest brännande och angelägna för er, vilka forskningsbehov och intressen ni har för forskning inom området och hoppas att du kan och vill vara med och bidra till samtalet. Jubileumsprogrammet hålls i Uppsala universitets nybyggda Humanistiska teater som är designad för att främja samtal och diskussion. Eftermiddagen avrundas med mat, ett glas vin och möjlighet till fortsatt samtal och nätverkande.

Programmet för eftermiddagen kommer att spikas inom kort och finnas tillgängligt på www.crs.uu.se, men anmäl dig gärna redan nu här

Varmt välkomna!

Martha Middlemiss Lé Mon Föreståndare, Centrum för forskning om religion och samhälle