Category Archives: Publishing Opportunities

Call for Collaborators: The Online Atlas of Religious Minorities Rights in the Council of Europe Countries

Dear Colleagues,

Italian scholar Silvio Ferrari has launched a massive project that will be of interest to NRM scholars and others researching religion. The description is below.  He is interested in possible collaborators with the project, particularly if anyone can assist in obtaining funding to expand the project. His email is: silvio.ferrari@unimi.it if you want to contact him. I would appreciate your sending me a copy if you do so, as I hope also to be involved: jtr@unr.edu .

James T. Richardson, J.D., Ph.D.
Foundation Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Judicial Studies
Mail Stop 311
University of Nevada, Reno
Reno, NV 89557

The Online Atlas of Religious Minorities Rights in the Council of Europe Countries

The project aims at producing an online Atlas of the religious minorities rights in the Council of Europe member States. The Atlas will provide a general overview of the religious minorities social and legal status in the CoE countries and, through its interactive format, the reader will also have access to data and information concerning a particular country, religious group, and area of rights. Each map will be complemented by a short text that places the map in its socio-historical context and, if necessary, provides further information. Maps and chapters will be updated every three years.

The Atlas is designed to offer an easy-to-read comparative description of the status of religious minorities in the CoE countries. It will consent to identify and compare the different levels of minorities rights protection granted by each State, the legal status enjoyed by each minority group both across the CoE countries and in each of them, and the specific areas of rights that are at stake (again both transversally across the CoE countries and in each of them). Particular attention will be devoted to the rights implementation so that the gap between formal entitlement and real enjoyment of rights is reduced.

The reader will be able to select a single religious minority, country, and area of rights (for example, education) and obtain the relevant information concerning the legal and social status enjoyed by the religious minority in that country and rights area. Alternatively, the reader can get a comparative view of the rights enjoyed by all religious minorities in a country (or a group of countries) or a comparative view of the rights enjoyed by a specific religious minority in all the CoE countries. These research tools can be further combined to obtain the data and information required by the reader.

We would also like to develop a reliable system for “measuring” the implementation of religious minorities rights. Based on the answers to two questionnaires, one for legal experts and the other for the religious minorities representatives, a set of indicators concerning the respect of religious minorities rights will be developed and used to assess each country.

A collection of maps on religious minorities rights has at least two added values in comparison to a book devoted to the same issue. First, it shows at a glance what words take much more time to explain. Second, maps can be combined and merged to show the intertwinement and overlapping of the different components of the minorities rights issue, reflecting its complexity much better than a book. Therefore it is to be expected that, through the Atlas, teachers, scholars, politicians, diplomats, NGOs activists, leaders of religious organizations, etc. will gain a better knowledge of the social and legal status of religious minorities and will be able to identify the subjects, countries and areas where minorities rights protection requires to be increased and strengthened.

While there are Atlases of linguistic or national minorities, religious minorities have been overlooked and this project will fill the gap.

Call for papers: Worldviews in creating meaning and purpose for learning

Special Issue: Journal of Beliefs & Values

We are happy to invite scholars to contribute in our special issue in the Journal of Beliefs & Values. JBV has been among the most respected journals in our field for a long time. We believe that our peer-reviewed special issue can contribute in the high-level scholarly discussion of the journal with a viewpoint represented especially by the EARLI SIG19 Conference 2018 (http://www.uef.fi/web/sig19conference2018/).

The Special Issue will be based on both the best papers of the EARLI SIG 19 conference 2018 and possible supplementing papers derived from this open call. We particularly welcome submissions that recognise the conference theme “Worldviews in creating meaning and purpose for learning”, and that address, for example, the following questions: How worldviews impact people’s motivation to learn, how worldviews guide people’s life choices and future orientation, and how worldviews and religions help people to find meaning and purpose in life.The articles can be empirical or philosophical. We anticipate not only methodological diversity but also wish the articles to reflect diverse interpretations and representations of worldviews, values and beliefs in education, cultural and national contexts.

We expect the authors to study the JBV homepage and familiarise oneself with the scope and format of the journal.https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cjbv20/current

The deadline for the full papers with the length and format of the JBV guidelines by 1st of October 2018. After the blind review process, the revised final versions of the manuscripts are expected to be submitted by 15th of December 2018. The estimated publication of the special issue will be in 2019.

Please contact guest editors with queries concerning the topic and send your contribution to Laura Hirsto (laura.hirsto@uef.fi).

Thank you!

CALL FOR PAPERS: Religion and Poverty

Thematic Collection in Palgrave Communications

Editors: Dr Gottfried Schweiger and Dr Helmut P Gaisbauer (University of Salzburg); Prof Clemens Sedmak (University of Notre Dame).

Website: https://www.nature.com/palcomms/for-authors/call-for-papers#religion-poverty

Submissions welcome on a rolling basis throughout 2018!

Poverty and religion are interrelated in different ways. On the one hand, for various religious traditions poverty is both an aspect of a particular faithful life (e.g. monastic communities) and giving to the poor is seen as a religious duty. Such traditions have evolved over time and expanded the role of faith-based organisations nowadays play in welfare provision and international development. Faith-based organizations play an important role in poverty alleviation both in rich and poor countries. These actions and practices, as well as their religious and theological underpinnings, deserve scrutiny. On the other hand, religion plays an important role in the life of people living in poverty: how they experience and shape their living, and how they find their place in society and the communities in which they. The role of religion in justifying certain inequalities and processes of exclusion (e.g. in India) and thus contributing to the sustainability of poverty is another important theme worth reflection.

We invite papers, from a range of disciplinary perspectives, that consider the following overarching question: how can religion be used as a vehicle to overcome structures of poverty, and how does it sometimes hinder such processes?

Contributions from sociology, development studies, religious studies, economics, theology, and other social sciences and humanities are welcomed; as are insights from different geographical settings, forms of poverty, and religious traditions.

This is a rolling article collection and as such submissions/proposals will be welcome throughout 2018.

This special issue is run in collaboration with the 2017 Salzburg Conference on Interdisciplinary Poverty Research, organised by the Centre for Ethics and Poverty Research of the University of Salzburg: www.poverty-conference.org

Session Proposals for “Revisiting Religion and Politics Research”

The ECPR Standing group on Religion and Politics invites you to submit panel proposals for the section

Revisiting Religion and Politics Research: Achievements, Critique, Future Questions

Section will be organized within the ECPR General Conference in Hamburg, 22-25th August 2018.

Section Chairs: Anja Hennig (ahennig@europa-uni.de) and Luca Ozzano (luca.ozzano@unito.it)

  • You may send your CfP via the Religion-Politics mailing-list, contact the section chairs
  • Deadline for submitting panel proposals to the section chairs: FEBRUARY 5th 2018
  • Panels include 3-5 papers
  • Panel proposals with max. 500 words and up to 5 keywords
  • Please note: For participating at the ECPR conference you must be registered at MyECPR: https://ecpr.eu/Login.aspx (please consider conference fees for non-members)

Section Description:


Despite an established research tradition on religion and politics that cuts across several sub-disciplines of political science as well as neighboring disciplines (or even constitutes a genuine sub-discipline), there is very little reflection today about the state of the art of this research.

As religion regained prominence in the public and political spheres since the 1970s and 1980s, a major concern among scholars was to question the prevailing secularization paradigm. The empirical study of religious actors, and their interaction with political forces, brought evidence to the fact that neither religion and politics are totally separated nor is religiosity fading away as modernization and secularization theories had assumed.

A vibrant academic debate joining comparative politics and political theory emerged. In recent years, the debate in Europe and the US gained in relevance through the salience of public debates brought by the rise in immigration from religious diverse backgrounds, and by new developments in relation to family patterns, reproduction techniques, genetic engineering and euthanasia.

Editorial projects abound. Several new handbooks on religion and politics (e.g. Jeff Haynes (2009/2016) or the Oxford Dictionary of Religion and Politics in the United States (2009), books and edited volumes have been published and new journals (e.g. APSA “Religion and Politics”) have been created. The disciplinary fragmentation and, thus, the sometimes isolated analysis of similar phenomena, however, leads to some conceptual confusion, and debate on the challenging questions in empirical and theoretical terms could be of use.

Against this background the Section invites scholars revisiting religion and politics research by reflecting perspectives, methods, pre-assumptions, general achievements and debating future questions. It is envisioned to publish a collection of papers selected from this section as a handbook.

For details:

Dr. Anja Hennig
Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin / Lecturer and Researcher
Lehrstuhl für Vergleichende Politikwissenschaft / Chair of Comparative Politics
Kulturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Faculty of Social and Cultural Sciences
Europa-Universität Viadrina / European University Viadrina
in / at Frankfurt/Oder

Call for Papers: Special Issues of the Open Access Journal “Religions”

Journal “Religions” announces five special issues open for submission

Transforming Encounters and Critical Reflection: African Thought, Critical Theory, and Liberation Theology in Dialogue (Deadline: 1 February 2018)
Guest Editors: Justin Sands, Anné Hendrik Verhoef

Women in Buddhism (Deadline: 1 March 2018)
Guest Editor: Lisa Battaglia

Current Trajectories in Global Pentecostalism: Culture, Social Engagement, and Change (Deadline: 30 April 2018)
Guest Editor: Roger G. Robins

Practicing Buddhism through Film (Deadline: 1 June 2018)
Guest Editor: Francisca Cho

Feminisms and the Study of “Religions” (Deadline: 28 February 2018)
Guest Editor: Darlene Juschka

To access the full list of open Special Issues, please click: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/special_issues

NOTE: Article processing charge of 350 Swiss Francs.  See http://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/apc

CFP: Special Issue “Interfaith on the World Stage”

Special Issue of The Review of Faith & International Affairs

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for the upcoming special issue of The Review of Faith & International Affairs on the theme of ‘Interfaith on the World Stage’. This special issue will be co-edited by John Fahy (Georgetown University, Qatar & Woolf Institute, Cambridge) and Jeffrey Haynes (London Metropolitan University). Please send abstracts (up to 200 words) to John Fahy atjef96@georgetown.edu by September 1st 2017.

Key words: Religion, international relations, interfaith, multifaith, interreligious, faith-based diplomacy

Outline

In the wake of the events of 9/11 there has emerged a now significant body of literature that seeks to account for the ‘return’ or ‘resurgence’ of religion in international relations (Fox & Sandler 2004, Snyder 2011, Fitzgerald 2011, Haynes 2012, Sandal & Fox 2013, Hunter 2016). Against a backdrop of secularisation theory, and often framed by historical processes such as globalisation and democratisation, this literature typically attributes religion’s marginalisation in global politics to Westphalian-informed assumptions that continue to pervade international relations today. Arguing that religion’s role in international relations can no longer be ignored, scholars have engaged with case studies as diverse as Buddhism in Sri Lanka, Shi’a Islam in Iran and Christian fundamentalism in the United States, to name but a few examples. Insofar as this literature focuses on particular religious traditions, however, a critical blind spot has developed whereby the contemporaneous proliferation of transnational interfaith (or multifaith, interreligious) initiatives has often been overlooked (cf. Braybrooke 1992, Marshall 2013). This special issue addresses this oversight by exploring the role of interfaith actors, organisations and initiatives in the broader re-emergence of religion in international affairs.

Although the interfaith movement can be traced back to the late 19th century, it gained unprecedented prominence in the years following 9/11. Interfaith initiatives were enlisted as part of wider multiculturalist responses to the threat of radicalisation in liberal democracies such as the United States, the UK and Australia. In the Middle East interfaith events came to represent important platforms for the promotion of ‘true’ or ‘moderate’ Islam, and continue to serve as valuable opportunities to counter the ‘clash of civilisations’ discourse that informs relations between the Islamic world and the West. In the last decade or so the United Nations has recognised interfaith actors and organisations as close allies, passing several important resolutions, for example, on ‘the promotion of interfaith dialogue’ (2004). Since 2011 the first week of February every year marks U.N. World Interfaith Harmony Week.

There are today dozens of interfaith organisations whose activities and agendas transcend national borders. Although their goals are as diverse as peace-building, conflict resolution, combating extremism, tackling poverty and addressing climate change, they share a common commitment to the idea that the world’s most pressing issues must be responded to not by side-lining, but by engaging, the world’s religious traditions. Interfaith has come to represent a particular mode of faith-based diplomacy (Johnston 2003), or what we might call ‘faiths-based diplomacy’, within which religion occupies a privileged rather than a peripheral place in international relations. There remains significant disagreement, however, as to the effectiveness of interfaith efforts. In contributing to debates that cohere around the broader resurgence of religion in international relations, this special issue fills an important gap in the literature by exploring the emergence of interfaith on the world stage.

Call for Papers: Women, Abortion, & Religioins

CALL FOR PAPERS

WOMEN, ABORTION AND RELIGIONS: DEBATES ON SEXUAL POLITICS, SUBJECTIVITIES AND RELIGIOUS FIELD. (PERIOD 2017-2018)

The Program on Gender Studies (PEG by its acronym in Spanish)- San Marcos National University and Flora Tristan Center of Peruvian Women are pleased to invite scholars and activists to submit articles for our editorial project Women, abortion and religions: debates on sexual policy, subjectivities and religious field.

Presentation

Over the last decades, we are more aware on abortion as a social complex issue with a field developed by a group of historical, cultural and politic processes, existing within global and local dynamics, as poverty, inequality, public health, secrecy, legality/illegality and also, without any doubt, religion thus establishing the characteristics of its practice, penalization and decriminalization. We consider that abortion as a social issue is a symptom of the infrastructure of sexual policy, that is, of the mechanisms through which sexual difference is developed in all societies. Therefore, to analyze the dynamics of abortion in contemporary societies is crucial to establish a genealogical exercise regarding the views and responses of women towards the place “assigned” to them, to their bodies and undoubtedly to their contribution on the development of citizenship. The abortion and women relationship displays a multitude of strengths, always starting and ending in their own bodies.

Several research studies point out religions have been one of those privileged fields for such processes. Evidently, from the post secular debate, religions have not stopped influencing neither the history of governmentality nor the construction of concrete forms of subjectivity, particularly related to abortion. This publishing aims at reflecting, analyzing and questioning these relations.

Religions can be analyzed as a place of control or also action (or both at the same time) related to the construction of women (spiritual, politic, cultural, human rights) demands. In this regard, studying the religious phenomenon from an intersectional gender perspective is a way to track the situation of women today, especially through the analysis of circumstances surrounding their abortions. Therefore, we are particularly interested in inquiring about those historical, political and social processes where religions support or oppose abortion and their effects in the lives of women. We look for papers with a profound investigation on one of these aspects (or both) based on the analysis of historical, ethnographic, legal material, among others. We focused on the existing interaction among different religious traditions (such as, Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, indigenous world views, among others) and said phenomenon.

This invitation seeks papers with an analysis on the role religions play in the history of governmentality regarding abortion. That is, we aim at studying the mechanisms, strategies, representations (among others), developed by religious fields and capitals existing within processes of influence and intervention of the religious discourse in States and also in the international policy (multilateral organisms, international cooperation) within the contemporary world.

This invitation also aims at analyzing the construction of corporalities, subjectivities and identities of women who experienced abortions, related to religious fields and capitals. In particular, their spiritual and/or religious or atheist practices, their experiences and perceptions. Within this framework, papers on world views/theologies, rites, mysticism, moral and memory can be included. We are also interested in exploring articles with a reflection on religious groups and collectives linked negatively or positively with abortion.

Beyond the post secular debate, the encounter with religions within the international scenario leads us to think on policies dynamics and new subjective constructions where religions are introduced as an important device on social analysis. In this regard, we are deeply interested in inquiring about the work of women or women movements (for example, Islamic, Catholic, Christian,

Jew women or with alternative beliefs) who have underwent abortion within their own spiritual traditions and ritualized practices, within each and every cultural and social context where traditions result transformed by their own demands.

Goals

The goals of this publishing aim at:

  1. Building a comparative and systematic perspective of the relation between religious discourses and abortion within contemporary societies.
  2. Analyzing the construction of subjectivities on women with abortion stories related to the religious phenomenon within local and regional specific contexts.

  3. Studying the historical, social and cultural dynamics where religious traditions play an important role on the promotion or rejection of abortion in contemporary societies.

  4. Reflecting on spiritual productions (practices, rituals, perceptions, among others) developed by women with abortion stories in different regions of the whole world in or out of religious traditions, with particular emphasis on the South-South dialogue.

Topics

Papers should include these thematic lines, although they are not restricted to:

  1. Religious traditions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Shintoism, Taoism, indigenous world views, among others), abortion and women within contemporary societies.
  • Local stories on the relation between abortion and women with different religious traditions.

  • Mechanisms, strategies and representations created by religious leaders or religious discourses existing or affecting the penalization or legalization of abortion within States or the international policy.

  • Spiritual practices of women on abortion in contemporary societies, in particular dialogues and resistances regarding their own religious traditions.

  • Analysis on any aspect regarding spiritual practices (such as divinity and rituality) from a feminist theological perspective.

  • Feminist theological production on abortion and women on each religious tradition.

  • Ability of women and groups of women to take action within the context of spiritual production regarding abortion.

  • Spiritual expressions related to non confessional practices, secularism, atheism and other contemporary spiritual manifestations on abortion.

  • Intersection among religious practices with sexuality, gender, race and social class within the women movement.

  • Relationship among spiritual production, ethical discourses and supporting practices from women, with particular emphasis on the South-South dialogue.

  • Relevant information To participate send an abstract with a maximum of 350 words until November 30th 2017 to Martin Jaime (mjaimeb@pucp.pe) and Fátima Valdivia (valdiviadelrio@gmail.com), academic editors of this compilation. Please include any questions or doubts.

    Once proposals are accepted you will receive a written notification. All articles will follow the APA (American Psychiatry Association) style and should have 8 000 to 10 000 words, without bibliography. All papers will be peer-reviewed by double blind pairs. Articles can be written either in English or in Spanish. Complete articles must be sent until June 30th 2018 to Martin Jaime and Fátima Valdivia, academic editors of this compilation, to the following e-mail addresses: mjaimeb@pucp.pe and valdiviadelrio@gmail.com

    CFP: “Exploring Contemporary Muslim Art, Culture, and Heritage in Britain”

    Call for Papers
    MUSLIM ART CONFERENCE
    Exploring Contemporary Muslim Art, Culture and Heritage in Britain
    14th September 2017, Birmingham

    Art and culture provide a means of communication, an alternative platform to share stories, celebrate contributions to society and challenge misconceptions and stereotypes. In Britain, Muslim art and culture are in transition as we see interchange between artists inspired by the traditional Islamic arts and those who are finding new ways of weaving together their British and Muslim identities. A rising generation is using artistic forms such as music, film, literature, photography, poetry and comedy to express themselves. As well as celebrating the diversity of British Muslim identity, these artists and cultural producers explore difficult issues and help bridge divides between communities.

    This new world creates exciting opportunities but also uneasy tensions as to where these practices can fit in the traditional canons of visual and performing arts, the heritage and museum sectors, in literature and even popular culture in Britain. British Muslims often find it difficult to present their work in mainstream arts and cultural establishments such as theatres, galleries and museums. Many upcoming Muslim artists work alone and often struggle to fund their work. Furthermore, the persistence of stereotypical representations of Muslims in popular media and cultural industries makes it harder for Muslims in the arts and cultural sectors to reach a wide audience.

    This one-day Muslims in Britain Research Network conference will create space for critical dialogue and community exchange by bringing aspiring and established Muslim artists and cultural producers together with eminent scholars and researchers, policymakers, entrepreneurs and arts funders. The conference will provide a space to discuss, inform, connect and engage through a program of lectures, presentations, panel discussions and workshops. Cultural experts will share insights into the key factors affecting Muslim arts and culture in Britain and will address the practical questions facing Muslim artists in the UK – from applying for their first grant to running an arts organisation, from creating social change to establishing and receiving commissions for national and international work.

    We invite the submission of papers, presentations, talks, session proposals, panel discussions, lightning talks, short performances to be presented on Thursday 14th September 2017 at a Birmingham venue (to be confirmed). We welcome proposals from scholars, curators, artists, cultural producers and programmers, and students and independent researchers. Sessions that include a mixture of scholars/researchers and practitioners are particularly encouraged. Although all paper proposals should speak to the theme of Muslim art and culture, we welcome submissions from individuals from any faith background and none.

    Themes we hope to cover in the conference include:
    • How are Muslims in Britain exploring identity, belonging and social change through art, culture and heritage?
    • How are Muslim art and culture represented in the cultural sector in Britain? Are the cultural industries responding to British Muslims’ demand for culture?
    • What does contemporary ‘Muslim’ and ‘Islamic’ art mean?
    • How does contemporary British Muslim cultural production compare/relate to the past and to other cultural contexts?
    • How are Muslim arts in Britain developing?
    • What strategies are needed to grow, fund, and sustain Muslim cultural production without compromising on beliefs and creativity?

    Individual presentations/responses should last no longer than 10-12 mins, and a full panel session no longer than one hour including audience Q&A.

    To participate please send a 200 word abstract to the email address below by Monday 31st July 2017 along with a biography of no more than 50 words (per speaker)

    Abstract submissions and any general questions should be sent to the conference organisers atmuslimsinbritainrn@gmail.com

    Selected academic papers and practitioner responses will be considered for publishing in a conference report and/or recorded and placed online.
    http://www.mbrn.org.uk/muslim-art-conference-2017-cfp/

    Call for Papers: “Complex Religion: Intersections of Religion and Inequality”

    Call for Papers

    Special Issue – Social Inclusion

    Volume 6, Issue 2

    Title: Complex Religion: Intersections of Religion and Inequality

    Editor: Melissa J. Wilde (University of Pennsylvania, USA)

    Deadline for Abstracts: 15 September 2017
    Submission of Full Papers: 15 to 31 January 2018
    Publication of the Issue: May/June 2018

    Information: Although scholars of American religion acknowledge religion’s deep interconnectedness with race, class, and ethnicity in the USA, we nonetheless typically study religion as a factor that is independent from other social structures. Likewise, we rarely systematically examine class, race or gender differences between or within American religious groups. This thematic issue will highlight research that moves beyond these weaknesses by publishing papers that intentionally examine aspects of inequality as they relate to religion. Papers that discuss both theoretical and methodological conundrums (and solutions) are welcome.

    Instructions for Authors: Authors interested in submitting a paper for this issue are asked to consult the journal’s editorial policies and to send their abstracts (about 200-250 words, with a tentative title) by email to the journal’s editorial office (si@cogitatiopress.com) by 15 September 2017.

    Open Access: The journal has an article publication fee to cover its costs and guarantee that the article can be accessed free of charge by any reader, anywhere in the world, regardless of affiliation. We defend that authors should not have to personally pay this fee and advise them to check with their institutions if funds are available to cover open access publication fees. Institutions can also join Cogitatio’s Membership Program at a very affordable rate and enable all affiliated authors to publish without incurring any fees. Further information about the journal’s open access charges and institutional members can be found here.

    Call for Manuscripts on “Interreligious Dialogue: From Religion to Geopolitics”

    CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS

    ANNUAL REVIEW OF THE SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

    Volume 10: Interreligious Dialogue: From Religion to Geopolitics

    Forthcoming 2019

    Edited by:

    Giuseppe Giordan (University of Padua, Italy) and

    Andrew P. Lynch (University of Sydney, Australia)

    The topic of interreligious dialogue is of critical importance at a time of increasing geopolitical tension. The urgency for developing better analytical tools for understanding interreligious dialogue is underscored by widespread concerns about religion and violence, and the security culture that this has given rise to in a number of nation states. Furthermore, globalization, technological developments, mass migration, and recent political upheavals and the narratives of exclusion that have been associated with them, highlights the need for greater levels of communication between religious groups. This volume seeks to investigate interreligious dialogue as a necessary component of global affairs in post-secular times, and in multi-faith societies facing increasing levels of cultural pluralism.

    To explore these issues we propose to include articles on the following themes, from the perspective of a range of different religions:

    1. Changing viewpoints and theories in the study of interreligious dialogue
    2. Interreligious dialogue and politics in the context of globalization
    3. Interreligious dialogue and debates about secularism and post-secularism
    4. Interreligious dialogue in the context of social diversity, cultural pluralism, and multi-faith societies
    5. Interreligious dialogue and emerging information technologies
    6. Interreligious dialogue in an age of terrorism
    7. Interreligious dialogue and migration

    Please send all proposals (300 words) to andrew.lynch@sydney.edu.au

    Deadlines:

    Submission of proposals: July 30, 2017

    Notification of acceptance: September 30, 2017

    Completed manuscripts (7,000 words): June 30, 2018