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EASA Panel Call – Houses and Domestic Space in the Diaspora

European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA)

15th Biannual Conference – Staying, Moving, Settling

Stockholm University, 14th – 17th August 2018

https://easaonline.org/conferences/easa2018/

 

PANEL P115 – Call

Houses and Domestic Space in the Diaspora

Materiality, Senses and Temporalities in Migrants’ Dwellings

Convenors:

Ester Gallo, University of Trento ester.gallo@unitn.it

Henrike Donner, Goldsmiths, University of London  H.Donner@gold.ac.uk

While images of stillness arouse when thinking of houses, the material, relational and symbolic significance of domestic space is implicated in a complex way in population movements. Houses are reference point in migrants’ home making but their meanings are also transformed and in the diaspora. Houses mirror migrants’ search of stability and yet also their dilemmas about the future, tensions in kinship relations, and ambivalent engagement to places. They do not stand only for the ‘privacy’ of domestic life, but are actively engaged in the challenges posed by political histories and present conflicts. Domestic materiality and temporality constitute a relevant and yet understudied context where to apprehend the intersections between macro-forces (market economy, political histories, gendered migration trends) and micro-practices (consumption, object display, daily spatial routines, and recalling) underpinning migration. We explore the relation between moving, settling and house making among diasporic population, and address the following questions:

 How does diaspora transform the meanings of houses among mobile population?

 What experiences of mobility (or immobility) are recalled, made visible or silenced through domestic space?

 What temporal engagements are disclosed through migrants’ material/relational organization of houses?

 What do diasporic houses say about people engagement with wider political histories of displacement and about (trans) national, ethnic or religious belonging?

  To what extent, and how, the social life of houses mirror changes in gender and class relations, and in the related meanings of femininity/masculinity?

We welcome papers addressing these questions through the analysis of different socio-geographical contexts and comparatively.

To Submit:https://nomadit.co.uk/easa/easa2018/conferencesuite.php/panels/6548

A short abstract of fewer than 300 characters; a long abstract of fewer than 250 words.  

Deadline: 9th April. 

Ester Gallo, PhD

Lecturer in Anthropology
Department of Sociology and Social Research
Via Verdi 26
38122 Trento, Italy
2017 The Fall of Gods. Memory, Kinship and Middle Classes in South India. Oxford University Press
2016 (with F.Scrinzi) Migration, Masculinities and Reproductive Labour. Men of the Home. Palgrave MacMillan

Symposium: Religion as Political Communication

Religion as Political Communication: A Symposium

10:00 – 16:00, 7th June 2018

Religion is communicated politically in multiple ways: by religious institutions and individuals, by governments with different approaches to religion, via various artistic and cultural expressions, by secular news media, and via digital platforms and communities (Lundby 2017). The types and contents of politically communicated religion are diverse and complex, ranging from the Church of England’s conservative stance on marriage as reserved for heterosexual couples, French lawmakers interpreting religious symbols such as the veil as ‘too political’, the West-End musical success ‘The Book of Mormon’, terrorist acts of violence committed in the name of religion, to representations of ‘Muslims’ as a non-diversified group. Religion can communicate political stances in both direct and indirect ways, such as when drawings of the Prophet Mohammad are considered as unacceptably irreverent expressions of free speech, or when specific positions on abortion, creationism, stem-cell research and euthanasia are inferred when someone declares their stance as ‘religious’. In this symposium, internationally leading scholars on religion and politics are invited to address and debate religion as political communication.

Programme

10:00 Welcome and introductions

10:15 Dr Elizabeth Poole (Keele University): Contesting #stopislam: Political frictions and appropriation in online spaces

10:45 Professor Jolyon Mitchell ((University of Edinburg): The Ambivalent Role of Religion and the Media Arts as Political Communication in Israel /Palestine

11:15 Q & A session

11:45 Lunch and networking

13:00 Dr Jasjit Singh (University of Leeds): The construction of ‘Sikh radicalisation’ in Britain

13:30 Professor Mia Løvheim (Uppsala University, Sweden): Religion, mediatization and a changing political landscape

14:00 Q & A

14:30 Coffee break and networking

15:00 Roundtable discussion

15:45 End of programme

Symposium organisers: Dr Line Nyhagen (Social Sciences), Dr Alexandre Christoyannopoulos (Politics, History and International Relations), PhD student Xinan Li (Social Sciences), Loughborough University.

For speakers’ abstracts, please see:

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/research/crcc/events/eventslist/religion-as-political-communication.html

Thank you.

Best wishes

Line, Alex and Xinan

Loughborough University

Epinal Way

Loughborough

Leicestershire, UK

LE11 3TU

Call for Manuscripts from Academica Press

Dear all, please take note:

Academica Press, a leading independent non-fiction publisher, is proud to call for manuscripts from dynamic scholars at all levels seeking to publish cutting edge work that challenges traditional disciplinary boundaries and provocatively revisits conventional topics. New publications will ideally be devoted to eclectic and under-explored issues and make imaginative uses of theory and method. Academica publishes actively in political science, international relations, history, literature, linguistics, religion, philosophy, cultural and regional studies, the arts, anthropology, law, and other fields.

The editorial director will gladly consider proposals for complete or nearly complete unpublished manuscripts.
Please direct all proposals and related inquiries via e-mail to:

The Editorial Director
Academica Press
editorial@academicapress.com

Call for Applications: Summer School “Religion in Cities”

Dear colleagues,

This is a reminder of the invitation to apply for the summer school Religion in Cities: ContestedPresences, Contested Regulations that I am organising, with the support of CRCG and ISOR-UAB, at the University of Groningen (Netherlands) on August 20-24 2018.

The summer school addresses a topic that generates heated political debates and that is increasingly discussed in the social sciences. It will provide undergraduate studentsin their last year of studies, as well as Master and PhD students in different disciplines with the means to reflect upon religious issues in cities from the perspective of sociology, geography, urban studies and religious studies.

The topic will be addressed from three different stand-points: a) theoretical perspectives to understand the presence, visibility and regulation of religious diversity in cities; b) methodological insights into how to research these topics and conduct fieldwork in concrete urban settings; and c) discussions about the political relevance and policy responses offered at the level of cities.

The deadline for applications is June 1, 2018.

Confirmed guest lecturers are: Dr. Avi Astor (Autonomous University of Barcelona), Dr. Marian Burchardt (University of Leipzig), Dr. Mar Griera (Autonomous University of Barcelona), Dr. Alexander-Kenneth Nagel (University of Göttingen), Dr. Joram Tarusarira (University of Groningen), and Dr. Stefania Travagnin (University of Groningen).

You can find further information about the preliminary program and lectures on our homepage.

Please, feel free to share this information with your colleagues and students and do not hesitate to contact me if you have any question.

Kind regards,

Julia Martínez

 

PhD Opportunity – Interfaith Movement in Australia

Hi everyone,
 
Please see below invitation for PHD scholarships information. Send on behalf of Dr Halafoff.
 
With best wishes,
Milad.
 
Dr Milad Milani | Lecturer in Islamic history and the study of religion
Communications Officer
 
cid:image001.jpg@01D38F76.431B93B0 
PhD Opportunity – Interfaith Movement in Australia 
The University of Tasmania has a long and distinguished history of innovation and research excellence.  Building on our distinctive island environment and intellectual capacity to solve global challenges, we have cemented a position within the top 2% of research institutions worldwide. The College of Arts, Law & Education, School of Social Sciences is offering a 3-year fully funded PhD scholarship for an Honours or equivalent graduate in Sociology and Criminology. This scholarship provides $27,082 per annum (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension. 
The research project
This project is one part of a larger ARC Discovery project on religious diversity in Australia led by Douglas Ezzy (University of Tasmania), Gary Bouma (Monash University), Greg Barton and Anna Halafoff (both from Deakin University).  The PhD project involves a study of the interfaith movement in Australia, focusing on evaluating their impact on responses to religious diversity. Interfaith organisations play significant roles in promoting respect for religious diversity, community policing, prison and health care chaplaincy, responses to disasters, and advancing the social cohesion that is crucial to countering violent extremism. The project involves research with leaders and activists in the Australian interfaith movement about the benefits of and challenges faced in their activities and their experience of liaising with state actors, including police and the media.  The PhD is at the University of Tasmania and will be supervised by Professor Douglas Ezzy and Dr Anna Halafoff.
Eligibility
The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:
  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis; 
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills. 
  • Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.  
Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include: Sociology and/or Religious Studies and experience in qualitative and/or quantitative methods.
How to apply
Applicants should contact Professor Douglas Ezzy at the School of Social Sciences (
Douglas.Ezzy@utas.edu.au) for more information and to discuss their suitability for the project.  Suitable applicants will then be asked to complete an application via the University of Tasmania’s Online Application System
 

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PhD Opportunity – Interfaith Movement in Australia

 PhD Opportunity – Interfaith Movement in Australia 

The University of Tasmania has a long and distinguished history of innovation and research excellence.  Building on our distinctive island environment and intellectual capacity to solve global challenges, we have cemented a position within the top 2% of research institutions worldwide. The College of Arts, Law & Education, School of Social Sciences is offering a 3-year fully funded PhD scholarship for an Honours or equivalent graduate in Sociology and Criminology. This scholarship provides $27,082 per annum (2018 rate) living allowance for 3 years, with a possible 6 month extension.

The research project
This project is one part of a larger ARC Discovery project on religious diversity in Australia led by Douglas Ezzy (University of Tasmania), Gary Bouma (Monash University), Greg Barton and Anna Halafoff (both from Deakin University).  The PhD project involves a study of the interfaith movement in Australia, focusing on evaluating their impact on responses to religious diversity. Interfaith organisations play significant roles in promoting respect for religious diversity, community policing, prison and health care chaplaincy, responses to disasters, and advancing the social cohesion that is crucial to countering violent extremism. The project involves research with leaders and activists in the Australian interfaith movement about the benefits of and challenges faced in their activities and their experience of liaising with state actors, including police and the media.  The PhD is at the University of Tasmania and will be supervised by Professor Douglas Ezzy and Dr Anna Halafoff.

Eligibility
The following eligibility criteria apply to this scholarship:

  • The scholarship is open to domestic (Australian and New Zealand) and international candidates;
  • The degree must be undertaken on a full-time basis;
  • Applicants must already have been awarded a First Class Honours degree or hold equivalent qualifications or relevant and substantial research experience in an appropriate sector;
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate strong research and analytical skills.
  • Candidates from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Knowledge and skills that will be ranked highly include: Sociology and/or Religious Studies and experience in qualitative and/or quantitative methods.

How to apply
Applicants should contact Professor Douglas Ezzy at the School of Social Sciences (Douglas.Ezzy@utas.edu.au) for more information and to discuss their suitability for the project.  Suitable applicants will then be asked to complete an application via the University of Tasmania’s Online Application System

Changing Face of European Pilgrimage

Pilgrimage Studies Network

EASA2018 conference: Staying, Moving, Settling
Stockholm University, 14-17th August 2018

PILNET panel: Changing Face of European Pilgrimage

Convenors
– John Eade (University of Roehampton and University of Toronto)
– Mario Katić (University of Zadar)

Short abstract
In this panel we want to examine intellectual contributions and debates involving the anthropological study of pilgrimage both across Europe and further afield. We want to locate the region within a global context where research draws on both European and non-European traditions.

Long abstract
In the rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field of pilgrimage studies, which covers not just religious pilgrimage but other key forms such as secular pilgrimage, spiritual pilgrimage, dark tourism, the relationship between travel, tourism and pilgrimage, many of the theoretical debates, methodological approaches and researchers have focused on the European context and most contributors are European in origin. In contemporary Europe the influence of different types of migration and tourism is becoming evident at some major Christian shrines and has also led to the emergence of non-Christian sites (primarily Hindu, Buddhist and Muslim). The diversity and complexity of pilgrimage practices is also apparent at more local shrines in the Balkans and the Mediterranean, for example, as members of trans-local communities return to their native countries during the summer holidays or re-settle. The growth of spiritual and secular pilgrimage and religious tourism adds to this diversity and complexity. Battlefield tourism and military pilgrimage illustrate the importance of cultural heritage since Europe continues to act as a magnet to non-European visitors, such as Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders, who feel connected through a shared past. In this panel we want to examine intellectual contributions and debates involving the anthropological study of pilgrimage (religious, spiritual, secular etc) both across Europe and further afield. We want to locate the region within a global context where research draws on both European and non-European traditions. We want to discuss not only the issues of reflexivity and autobiography but also discursive traditions linked to political and cultural systems.
To propose a paper:
https://nomadit.co.uk/easa/easa2018/conferencesuite.php/panels/6479

RC-22 Newsletter #18

Issue #18 of the Research Committee on the Sociology of Religion’s newsletter is now available on our website or by clicking the picture below.  The newsletter contains information about the upcoming World Congress of Sociology.  Our Program Coordinators — Anna Halafoff, Carolyn Starkey, and Sam Han — have done a wonderful job putting together an exciting program.  I hope that you will be able to join us in Toronto next summer.

The newsletter also contains a call for nominations for the next President, Secretary-Treasurer, and Board Members.  See the newsletter for details.

Best,
Jim Spickard
RC-22 President

 

Financial inclusion of Muslims

Dear all,
 
Financial inclusion is high on the agenda for governments as well as for organizations such as the World Bank. Research has pointed out that Muslims worldwide are less included in the formal financial system than non-Muslims, but there is no knowledge about the extent to which religious norms (most importantly the ban on interest on money) lead to financial exclusion among Muslims in the West. In this article I approach the issue of financial exclusion and inclusion through three interrelated questions that will be answered with data collected in Norway 2015 and 2016. The questions are: (a) To what extent do Muslims see conventional banking as a problem in their own lives? (b) Do level of education, age, national background or level of religiosity predict demand for Islamic banking? (c) Is demand for Islamic banking changing? This article is a first step in what should be a broader research program to find out whether and how religious norms cause financial exclusion of Muslims in the West. The article is freely available here:
 
journals.sagepub.com
Subscription and open access journals from SAGE Publishing, the world's leading independent academic publisher.
 
The article is a first step in a larger research effort based at he Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO). See:
 
www.prio.org
Money and finance have been regarded as major moral problems in all the world religions. The past few decades have seen a revival in Islamic thinking about bank
 
Torkel Brekke
Research Professor, PRIO