Summer School "Islam in Russia".

During 20-26 of Ausgust the European University at Saint Petersburg organize the 4th Summer School “Islam in Russia”.

Working languages are Russian and English.

Please send your CV, Motivation letter and writing sample to ababushkina@eu.spb.ru  before 30 of May, 2018 г.

Here is the call in Russian:
Исследовательская лаборатория
«Ислам в России IV: городская культура и конвенции памяти»
Пенза, 20-26 августа 2018 г.

Организаторы:
Европейский университет в Санкт-Петербурге
Культурно-просветительский центр им. Х.Д. Тенишевой
Цель мероприятия – формирование исследовательских навыков у молодых
ученых, изучающих исламскую культуру в России и в ближнем зарубежье.
Наша исследовательская лаборатория ориентирована на начинающих
исследователей, делающих первые шаги в науке. Мы поможем с написанием
научных текстов, обсудим тонкости работы в «поле», будь то городская
среда или сельская местность. Все занятия в лаборатории интерактивны.
Каждый участник будет иметь возможность обсудить свой текст,
исследовательские планы, протестировать гипотезы и поработать с
коллегами над общим проектом. В рамках мероприятия запланированы квесты,
экскурсии, открытые лекции и мастер-классы в татарской слободе г. Пензы,
на городище Наровчат, а также в с. Средняя Елюзань.
Участниками школы могут стать:
студенты всех курсов гуманитарных направлений (бакалавры и магистры,
аспиранты первых курсов);
приветствуется знание английского и/или одного восточного языка.
За несколько недель до мероприятия участникам будут разосланы учебные
материалы.


Заявка на участие должна включать: CV, мотивационное письмо и письменную
работу (статья, эссе, дипломная работа и т.п.).
Принимающая сторона оплачивает проживание и питание участников.
Просьба присылать заявки на адрес ababushkina@eu.spb.ru до 30 мая 2018
г.
https://eu.spb.ru/announcements/18903-islam-v-rossii-iv

CFP: International Workshop “Religious Contacts in Early Modern Scandinavia 1500-1750”

The Käte Hamburger Kolleg Dynamics in the History of Religions between Asia and Europe of the Center for Religious Studies (CERES) invites papers to be presented at the international workshop “Religious Contacts in Early Modern Scandinavia 1500-1750” to be held 10-11 October 2018 in Bochum, Germany.

The workshop will bring together scholars of religious studies, history and cultural studies from the Northern countries as well as Baltic States, German-speaking countries and beyond to explore further the multitude of religious contacts on and around the Scandinavian Peninsula and the Baltic in Early Modern Age.

Among others we would like to compare case studies of different religious contacts and how they were executed by the actors involved. The focus will be rather on the situation and effect of religious contact than on a single religious group.

Examples to be discussed are among others:
– indigenous religions’ (Sami, Karelian, Inuits of Greenland) encounters with Lutheranism and/or Pietism,
– adaption and local alignments of, or resistance towards ideas derived from Protestant Reformation,
– encounters of Scandinavian colonists with the religious beliefs practiced by native peoples (of North America, Africa, Asia),
– early encounters between Protestantism and Orthodox Christianity in Finland and the Baltic,
– Jewish communities of and Jewish migration towards the Scandinavia peninsula in Early Modern Times,
– the spread of non-theistic Enlightenment ideas in Scandinavia and the Baltic before 1750.

Each participant is invited to present a paper in English.

The paper shall later be published in the Käte Hamburger Kolleg’s peer reviewed online journal Entangled Religions (https://er.ceres.rub.de/). All costs (travel expenses, accommodation, dining) will be covered by the Käte Hamburger Kolleg.

The Käte Hamburger Kolleg Dynamics in the History of Religions between Asia and Europe is an international research institution directly funded by the German government. It conducts research in the field of religious studies and history of religion that is dedicated to the formation and expansion of religions, the mutual permeation of religious traditions and their densifications into the complex figurations called ‘world religions.’ Find more information here: https://khk.ceres.rub.de/en/

The Käte Hamburger Kolleg welcomes applications including an abstract on the intended paper to be presented (max 1,500 words) and a short notice about the academic affiliation of the applicant. Applications should be submitted electronically to ulf.plessentin@rub.de no later than June 15, 2018.


New Pew Study Released

Being Christian in Western Europe

The majority of Europe’s Christians are non-practicing, but they differ from religiously unaffiliated people in their attitudes toward Muslims and immigrants, views on God, and opinions about religion’s role in society

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 29, 2018) – Western Europe, where Protestant Christianity originated and Catholicism has been based for most of its history, has become one of the world’s most secular regions. Although the vast majority of adults say they were baptized, today many do not describe themselves as Christians. Some say they gradually drifted away from religion, stopped believing in religious teachings, or were alienated by scandals or church positions on social issues, according to a major new Pew Research Center survey of religious beliefs and practices in Western Europe.

Yet most adults surveyed still do consider themselves Christians, even if they seldom go to church. The survey shows that non-practicing Christians (defined, for the purposes of this report, as people who identify as Christians, but attend church services no more than a few times per year) make up the biggest share of the population across the region. In every country except Italy, they are more numerous than church-attending Christians (those who go to religious services at least once a month). Non-practicing Christians also outnumber the religiously unaffiliated population (people who identify as atheist, agnostic or “nothing in particular,” sometimes called the “nones”) in most of the countries surveyed.

The Pew Research Center study – which involved more than 24,000 telephone interviews with randomly selected adults, including nearly 12,000 non-practicing Christians – finds that Christian identity remains a meaningful marker in Western Europe, even among those who seldom go to church. It is not just a “nominal” identity devoid of practical importance. On the contrary, the religious, political and cultural views of non-practicing Christians often differ from those of church-attending Christians and religiously unaffiliated adults.

Indeed, Christian identity in Western Europe is associated with higher levels of negative sentiment toward immigrants and religious minorities. On balance, self-identified Christians – whether they attend church or not – are more likely than religiously unaffiliated people to express negative views of immigrants, as well as of Muslims and Jews.

For example, in the UK, 45% of church-attending Christians say Islam is fundamentally incompatible with British values and culture, as do roughly the same share of non-practicing Christians (47%). But among religiously unaffiliated adults, fewer (30%) say Islam is fundamentally incompatible with their country’s values. There is a similar pattern across the region on whether there should be restrictions on Muslim women’s dress in public, with Christians more likely than “nones” to say Muslim women should not be allowed to wear any religious clothing in public.

Churchgoing Christians, non-practicing Christians and religiously unaffiliated people also differ in their attitudes on nationalism. Non-practicing Christians are less likely than church-attending Christians to express nationalist views. Still, they are more likely than “nones” to say that their culture is superior to others and that it is necessary to have the country’s ancestry to share the national identity (e.g., one must have Spanish family background to be truly Spanish).

For instance, in France, nearly three-quarters of church-attending Christians (72%) say it is important to have French ancestry to be “truly French.” Among non-practicing Christians, 52% take this position, but this is still higher than the 43% of religiously unaffiliated French adults who say having French family background is important in order to be truly French.

The survey, which was conducted following a surge of immigration to Europe from Muslim-majority countries, asked many other questions about national identity, religious pluralism and immigration.

Most Western Europeans say they are willing to accept Muslims and Jews in their neighborhoods and in their families, and most reject negative statements about these groups. And, on balance, more respondents say immigrants are honest and hardworking than say the opposite.

But a clear and consistent pattern emerges: Both church-attending and non-practicing Christians are more likely than religiously unaffiliated adults in Western Europe to voice anti-immigrant, anti-minority and nationalist views.

There also are other factors beyond religious identity that are closely connected with these positions. For example, higher education and personally knowing someone who is Muslim tend to go hand in hand with more openness to immigration and religious minorities. And identifying with the political right is strongly linked to anti-immigration stances. Still, even after using statistical techniques to control for these factors (and several others, including age and gender) Western Europeans who identify as Christian are more likely than those who have no religious affiliation to express negative feelings about immigrants and religious minorities.

Other key ways in which non-practicing Christians, churchgoing Christians and religiously unaffiliated adults in the region differ include:

• Although many non-practicing Christians say they do not believe in God “as described in the Bible,” they do tend to believe in some other higher power or spiritual force. By contrast, most church-attending Christians say they believe in the biblical depiction of God. And a clear majority of religiously unaffiliated adults do not believe in any type of higher power or spiritual force in the universe.

• Non-practicing Christians tend to express more positive than negative views toward churches and religious organizations, saying they serve society by helping the poor and bringing communities together. Their attitudes toward religious institutions are not quite as favorable as those of church-attending Christians, but they are more likely than religiously unaffiliated Europeans to say churches and other religious organizations contribute positively to society.

• The vast majority of non-practicing Christians, like the vast majority of the unaffiliated in Western Europe, favor legal abortion and same-sex marriage. Church-attending Christians are more conservative on these issues, though even among churchgoing Christians, there is substantial support – and in several countries, majority support – for legal abortion and same-sex marriage.

• Nearly all churchgoing Christians who are parents or guardians of minor children (those under 18) say they are raising those children in the Christian faith. Among non-practicing Christians, somewhat fewer – though still the overwhelming majority – say they are bringing up their children as Christians. By contrast, religiously unaffiliated parents generally are raising their children with no religion.

These are among the key findings of the new Pew Research Center survey. The study, funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John Templeton Foundation, is part of a larger effort by Pew Research Center to understand religious change and its impact on societies around the world.

Read the report: http://www.pewforum.org/2018/05/29/being-christian-in-western-europe/

For more information, or to arrange an interview with the study’s lead authors, Associate Director of Research Neha Sahgal and Director of Religion Research Alan Cooperman, please contact Anna Schiller at (+1) 202-419-4372 or aschiller@pewresearch.org.

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Pew Research Center is a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world. It does not take policy positions. The Center is a subsidiary of The Pew Charitable Trusts, its primary funder. Subscribe to our daily and weekly email newsletters or follow us on ourFact Tank blog.

New Issue of the journal Scandinavian Jewish Studies

Theme: The Problem of Evil and Images of (in)Humanity

Guest Editors: Cathrine Bjørnholt Michaelsen & Claudia Welz

You find the journal at https://journal.fi/nj/issue/view/4934

Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies aims at promoting Jewish studies in Scandinavia by publishing scholarly articles, surveys and documents, by reviewing recent literature, and compiling bibliographies. The contributions are published in one of the Scandinavian languages, or in English, German or French, with an abstract in English. The journal is strictly academic and does not pursue any special religious, political or cultural policy. It is published open access online.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

Karin Hedner Zetterholm & Ruth Illman
Editors of Nordisk judaistik/Scandinavian Jewish Studies

Australasian Association of Buddhist Studies Conference 2018

We are pleased to announce the 2018 AABS conference, which will be hosted by the Alfred Deakin Institute and Buddhist Studies@Deakin. This interdisciplinary conference will provide a forum for scholars and students of Buddhism to explore the rich tapestry of Buddhist cultures, philosophies, and practices in traditional settings and in modern social life.

For full details, please visit the conference website.
8–9 November 2018
Deakin Downtown, Level 12, Tower 2
727 Collins Street, Melbourne VIC 3008

Keynote speakers

Ann Gleig, University of Central Florida

John Powers, Deakin University

Amber D. Carpenter, Yale-National University of Singapore College
The conference committee is now inviting submissions of proposals for papers in all areas of Buddhist studies, including the following themes:

  • Buddhism in Australasia
  • Buddhism in the ‘West’
  • Buddhism and philosophy
  • Buddhism in contemporary Asia
  • Buddhist texts and contexts
  • Historical studies of Buddhism
  • Engaged Buddhism
  • Buddhism, art and architecture
  • Buddhism and meditation
  • Food, animals, and Buddhism

Panel proposals on these or additional themes with three abstracts are also welcome. Postgraduate students are especially encouraged to present their research, for which bursaries may be available. The closing date for proposals is 31 July 2018. For further details, please see the call for papers flyer.

Conference convenors: Leesa Davis, Anna Halafoff and John Powers, Deakin University

Call for Collaborators: The Online Atlas of Religious Minorities Rights in the Council of Europe Countries

Dear Colleagues,

Italian scholar Silvio Ferrari has launched a massive project that will be of interest to NRM scholars and others researching religion. The description is below.  He is interested in possible collaborators with the project, particularly if anyone can assist in obtaining funding to expand the project. His email is: silvio.ferrari@unimi.it if you want to contact him. I would appreciate your sending me a copy if you do so, as I hope also to be involved: jtr@unr.edu .

James T. Richardson, J.D., Ph.D.
Foundation Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Judicial Studies
Mail Stop 311
University of Nevada, Reno
Reno, NV 89557

The Online Atlas of Religious Minorities Rights in the Council of Europe Countries

The project aims at producing an online Atlas of the religious minorities rights in the Council of Europe member States. The Atlas will provide a general overview of the religious minorities social and legal status in the CoE countries and, through its interactive format, the reader will also have access to data and information concerning a particular country, religious group, and area of rights. Each map will be complemented by a short text that places the map in its socio-historical context and, if necessary, provides further information. Maps and chapters will be updated every three years.

The Atlas is designed to offer an easy-to-read comparative description of the status of religious minorities in the CoE countries. It will consent to identify and compare the different levels of minorities rights protection granted by each State, the legal status enjoyed by each minority group both across the CoE countries and in each of them, and the specific areas of rights that are at stake (again both transversally across the CoE countries and in each of them). Particular attention will be devoted to the rights implementation so that the gap between formal entitlement and real enjoyment of rights is reduced.

The reader will be able to select a single religious minority, country, and area of rights (for example, education) and obtain the relevant information concerning the legal and social status enjoyed by the religious minority in that country and rights area. Alternatively, the reader can get a comparative view of the rights enjoyed by all religious minorities in a country (or a group of countries) or a comparative view of the rights enjoyed by a specific religious minority in all the CoE countries. These research tools can be further combined to obtain the data and information required by the reader.

We would also like to develop a reliable system for “measuring” the implementation of religious minorities rights. Based on the answers to two questionnaires, one for legal experts and the other for the religious minorities representatives, a set of indicators concerning the respect of religious minorities rights will be developed and used to assess each country.

A collection of maps on religious minorities rights has at least two added values in comparison to a book devoted to the same issue. First, it shows at a glance what words take much more time to explain. Second, maps can be combined and merged to show the intertwinement and overlapping of the different components of the minorities rights issue, reflecting its complexity much better than a book. Therefore it is to be expected that, through the Atlas, teachers, scholars, politicians, diplomats, NGOs activists, leaders of religious organizations, etc. will gain a better knowledge of the social and legal status of religious minorities and will be able to identify the subjects, countries and areas where minorities rights protection requires to be increased and strengthened.

While there are Atlases of linguistic or national minorities, religious minorities have been overlooked and this project will fill the gap.

SISR/ISSR Conference in Barcelona, July 2019. Call for Session Proposals.

sisr newsletter domidona

About the next ISSR Conference

Dear members of the ISSR

We have important news. While we initially planned to have our conference 2019 in Warsaw at UKSW, this has finally not been possible. The next ISSR conference will be held in Barcelona, Spain, 9-12 July, 2019 under the title “The Politics of Religion and Spirituality”.
The chairperson of the local committee is Prof. Mar Griera whom we thank for taking on the
organization at such short notice.

More practical information will follow soon.

Conference Theme: “The Politics of Religion and Spirituality”, click here.

Call for session

The call for for Session proposals, is now open. You may propose a Thematic Session by using this link. You can submit proposals until 30th August 2018 (200-250 words in English; please also provide a French translation):

  • Thematic session – A session with papers on a common theme. If the theme attracts many papers, the thematic session may stretch over several slots.
  • Working Group session – A session of papers presented by those who work together on a specific project.
  • New Research Forum – Intended for students and young researchers (PhDs). The NRF usually have two sessions with a common theme and a session for free papers that do not fit into the other ISSR thematic sessions.
  • Author Meets Critics session – A session in which an author meets scholars who criticize his/her book and responds.
    via our system:

This is not yet the call for individual paper proposals. The call for paper proposals will be opened in mid-September.

Attention: you do need to be an ISSR member, or renew your membership to submit a session proposal.

Call for proposals for the ISSR best book award

The ISSR invites nominations for an award for the best book in the sociology of religion.

Books published in 2016-2018 in French or English (except edited books) may be nominated by the authors or ISSR members by sending a nomination letter and THREE copies of the book to the General Secretary Office (Véronique Altglas, School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, United Kingdom).

The deadline for nominations is 15 September 2018.

Winner(s) will receive their awards at the 2019 ISSR Conference. They are exempt of paying the conference fee.

Call for membership renewal

If you have not already done so, please do not delay in renewing your membership for the 2018-2019 period. The place to do this is directly through the Membership page or your profile page after logging into our website and, if at all possible, electronically. It is still possible to do this by regular mail, however. The form can be found on the website as well: https://www.sisr-issr.org/Documents/SISR_Membership_Form_2018_2019.pdf.

Workshop Grants

In light of its mission to foster international exchange in the sociology of religion, the ISSR supports proposals for international workshops on innovative research topics in the field. Two proposals were submitted. We are delighted to announce that Paul Bramadat (University of Victoria, Canada), Marian Burchardt (University of Leipzig, Germany), Mar Griera (Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain) and Julia Martínez-Ariño (University of Groningen, Netherlands, obtained a grant for their project on “Understanding urban religion: heritage, public space and governance”.
The ISSR congratulates the winner!


A propos de la prochaine conférence de la SISR

Chers membres de la SISR

Nous avons d’importantes nouvelles. Nous avions pour projet de tenir notre conférence en 2019 a Varsovie a l’UKSW, ceci n’est finalement pas possible. La prochaine conférence de la SISR aura lieu à Barcelone en Espagne, du 9 au 12 juillet 2019 sous le titre : « Les politiques de la religion et de la spiritualité ».
Le président du Comité local est Mar Griera, que nous remercions chaleureusement d’avoir accepté de reprendre l’organisation de la conférence dans ces courts délais.

Plus d’information pratiques ultérieurement.

Thème de la conférence « Les politiques de la religion et de la spiritualité », cliquez ici.

Appel pour sessions thématiques

L’appel à propositions de sessions thématiques est maintenant ouvert. Il est possible de proposer une session thématique utilisant le lien suivant. Avant de le faire, veuillez consulter les instructions d’inscription au système ouvert des conférences en ligne mais aussi pour soumission des propositions. En complément des propositions de sessions thématiques, vous pouvez aussi proposer des sessions de groupes de travail, forums de jeunes chercheurs, et un auteur face à la critique sessions.

Vous pouvez dès lors soumettre votre proposition jusqu’au 30 Aout 2018 (200-250 mots en en français; nous vous prions d’ajouter également une traduction en Anglais):

  • Une session thématique – une session qui rassemble des contributions sur un même thème. Si la session attire un grand nombre de contributions, elle sera répartie sur plusieurs tranches horaires.
  • Une session d’un groupe de travail – Une session rassemblant des contributions présentées par des personnes travaillant ensemble sur un projet spécifique
  • Forum des jeunes chercheurs-ses – A l’intention des étudiants-tes et jeunes chercheurs-ses (PhD). Le forum est habituellement constitué de deux sessions. L’une sur un thème commun et l’autre pour des contributions libres n’entrant pas dans les autres sessions thématiques de la SISR.
  • Auteur face à la critique – Une session dans laquelle un-e auteur-e rencontre des pairs pour discuter son ouvrage.

Ceci n’est pas encore un appel pour des contributions individuelles (“Papers”). L’appel à contributions individuelles (“Papers”) commencera en mi-septembre.

Attention: Vous devez être membre de la SISR, ou renouveler votre adhésion pour proposer un projet de session.

Appel à propositions pour le prix SISR du meilleur livre

La SISR invite à proposer les nominations des livres en sociologie des religions pour le Prix SISR du meilleur livre. Les livres publiés en 2016-2018 en Français ou en Anglais (à l’exception d’ouvrages collectifs) peuvent être désignés par l’auteur ou par des membres de la SISR en envoyant une lettre de nomination ainsi que TROIS copies du livre, au Secrétaire Général (Véronique Altglas, School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Royaume-Uni).

Le délai de dépôt des nominations est le 15 septembre 2019.

Les lauréats recevront leur prix lors de la conférence de la SISR en 2019. Ils/elles seront exonéré(e)s de payer les frais d’inscription de la conférence.

Renouvellement de votre adhésion
Si vous ne l’avez pas encore fait, veuillez renouveler votre adhésion à la SISR pour la période 2018-2019. Vous pouvez le faire directement sur la page Adhésion ou dans votre profil après vous être connecté sur notre site web et, si possible, par voie électronique. Il est tout de même encore possible de renouveler par le poste. Le formulaire à imprimer se trouve également sur le site web: https://www.sisr-issr.org/Documents/SISR%20affiliation_reaffilliation_2018_2019.pdf.

Bourse pour atelier

Compte tenu de sa mission de favoriser les échanges internationaux en sociologie des religions, la SISR soutient des propositions d’ateliers internationaux sur des sujets de recherches novateurs dans le domaine. Deux candidatures ont été soumises. Nous sommes ravis d’annoncer que Paul Bramadat (University of Victoria, Canada), Marian Burchardt (University of Leipzig, Germany), Mar Griera (Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain) and Julia Martínez-Ariño (University of Groningen, Netherlands, a obtenu une bourse pour leur projet. “Understanding urban religion: heritage, public space and governance”.

Félicitations de la part de la SISR!

2nd International Congress on Spiritual/Religious Counselling and Care

image

For deadlines, paper guidelines, and conference details, please visit: http://mdrk.org/en

OVERVIEW

has contributed to society and individual in variety of areas like psycho-social, cultural, economic, solidarity/cooperation and humanitarian aids etc. It has been a source of inspiration and motivation to mobilize individuals, communities and institutions in order to cooperate, make solidarity, and social and moral support.

This international congress, entitled Spiritual Counselling and Care (SCC), emphasizes the human aspects of religious beliefs and moral values; to appreciate the contributions they make to individual and social life, and to raise a popular and academic awareness of the perception of religion that is touched by human life. In this context, it aims particularly to examine the place, role, function and contribution of religion and spirituality in family therapy, in reforming and rehabilitation of inmates in prisons, for being a source of hope and morale to patients in health care services in hospitals, in the formation of moral and motivation in the military, in creating spiritual atmosphere for elderly and disadvantaged groups in social services.

The first spiritual counselling and care scholarly gathering within the scope of this congress as planned series of conferences was held in April 2016 in Istanbul, Turkey. The main theme of the ‘1 st International Congress on Religious-Spiritual Counselling and Care’ was ‘The Place and Function of Spiritual Counselling and Care in Human Life’ aiming to give a broad coverage of all issues, practices and problems in the field. This upcoming and subsequent congressional themes will be continued in more specific areas. In the context of institutionalized service unit thematisation, the main theme of the ‘2 nd International Congress on Spiritual/Religious Counselling and Care’ that is scheduled to be held on November 22-24, 2018 will be on ‘Spiritual/Religious Counselling and Care in Prison and Healthcare Services.

By organising such a congress, it is expected to shed light on the future studies of spiritual and religious counselling and care by taking into account the rapidly developing field of expertise in Turkey from an interdisciplinary perspective at international platform.

Conference ‘Religion and Culture in Conflict and Peace’

Good afternoon,

I’d like to share with you the forthcoming conference ‘Religion and Culture in Conflict and Peace’ organised by the centre of Religion Reconciliation and Peace at the University of Winchester, 20-21 June 2018, I think the programme may be of interest to you. We’d be most grateful if you could share this information with anyone you know who could be interested.

Key speakers include Mohammed Abu-nimer and Susan Hayward. As well as some fascinating papers looking at conflicts from around the world, we have also built in a history walk of the City of Winchester.

More information and booking via the conference website:https://www.winchesterpeaceconference.com/

With best wishes,

Rebecca Bellamy

Centre Coordinator & Partnerships Officer

On part-time secondment to the European Council of Religious Leaders

Winchester Centre of Religion, Reconciliation and Peace (WCRRP)