Public Seminar: Undoing Whiteness in American Buddhist Modernism

Undoing Whiteness in American Buddhist Modernism: Critical, Contextual, and Collective Turns

5 November 2018

Parramatta South Campus, PS-EA.1.04

10:30-12:00

Speaker: Associate Prof Ann Gleig (University of Central Florida)

This paper explores the ways in which whiteness has functioned in the construction of Buddhist modernism in North America. Drawing on ethnography and textual analysis, it outlines key attempts by Buddhists of Color, and their white allies, to expose and overcome such whiteness before turning to a detailed examination of the pioneering work of Zenju Earthlyn Manuel from the Soto Zen lineage and Larry Yang from the Insight Community to forge an alternative Buddhist hermeneutics of multiculturalism and difference. In conclusion, it situates their work as reflecting critical, collective, and contextual turns in North American Buddhism that signify a wider shift from Buddhist modernism to Buddhism in a postmodern and post-colonial climate.

Ann Gleig is an Associate Professor of religion and cultural studies at the University of Central Florida. Her area of specialization is Buddhism in America and her forthcoming monograph American Dharma: Buddhism Beyond Modernity will be published by Yale University Press in February 2019.

RSVP: 29 October 2018

Alan Nixon: a.nixon@westernsydney.edu.au

Call for Papers: The International Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage Conference

The International Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage Conference (IRTP) organized by the Institute for Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage (IRTP) in conjunction with the International Journal of Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage (IJRTP) and Singidunum University, Belgrade, Serbia invites abstracts for their 11th International Conference to be held from 26th – 29th June 2019 at the Singidunum University, Belgrade, Serbia.

The aim of the conference is to provide both empirical and personal insights into the changing nature of religion in society and to further the debate for both policy-makers and academics to consider these evolving challenges within the future development of faith tourism and pilgrimage. The main emphasis for acceptance at this event is based on participants presenting papers, which apply to the main themes of the conference.

The key themes of the conference include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • * Theory and Theology of Religious Tourism
  • * Pilgrimage as Process
  • * Secular v Ritual Tourism
  • * Virtual Religious Experience
  • * Risks and Conflicts of/at Sacred Sites
  • * Motivation of Pilgrimage and Religious Tourism
  • * Media and Cultural Challenges for Pilgrimage
  • * Pilgrimage Routes Modern and Ancient
  • * Pilgrimage, Spirituality, Religion and Tourism
  • * Promoting and Experiencing Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage
  • * Religious and Culture Tourism

Important Dates:

  • Abstract submissions: 31st January 2019
  • Notification of Abstract Acceptance: 28th February 2019
  • Conference Registration Deadline and
  • submission of extended abstract: 15th May 2019
  • Full Paper Submission: 15th July 2019

The conference takes place at the Singidunum University, Belgrade, Serbia – Boulevard Peka Dapčevića (Kumodraška St., 261a). The University is located in two locations (Danijelova St., 32, and Boulevard Peka Dapčevića (Kumodraška St., 261a – our event location). To see the location, follow this link

The international “Nikola Tesla” airport in Belgrade is 15-20 minutes away from the city centre. There are various transfers available to and from the airport. We suggest mini bus line A1 which takes you to the city centre (Slavija square) or a taxi service. A flat-rate taxi service can be booked in the arrivals hall for approximately 20 Euro. For more information see the airport website. Taxis are available throughout the city of Belgrade, especially at the airport, train station and hotels.

All detailed information about the Conference can be found in the attached Call for papers or at our web site: www.irtp.co.uk

Job Opening: Digital Scholarship Fellow

The Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University is hiring a Digital Scholarship Fellow to lead the Center’s development of innovative digital scholarship tools for research, scholarly collaboration, publication, dissemination, and pedagogy.

The Center for the Study of Law and Religion is a global leader in the field of law and religion. Founded at Emory University in 1982, the Center’s mission is to produce and promote path-breaking scholarship, teaching, and public programs on the interaction of law and religion around the world. To fulfill this mission, the Center offers six degree programs and dozens of courses, edits three book series and the Journal of Law and Religion, and runs international and interdisciplinary research projects.

To learn more about the Center, visit https://cslr.law.emory.edu.

To apply, visit https://faculty-emory.icims.com/jobs/26839/job.

Job Description

The Digital Scholarship Fellow leads the Center for the Study of Law and Religion’s development of innovative digital scholarship tools for research, scholarly collaboration, publication of research, dissemination of research, and pedagogy. The Fellow is responsible for maintaining and improving the Center’s current online platforms, including the Center’s website and social media; researching and introducing new developments and best practices in digital scholarship to the Center; collaborating with Center leadership to incorporate digital scholarship into the Center’s scholarly initiatives; and collaborating with faculty teaching in law and religion to incorporate digital scholarship into classroom pedagogy.

The Digital Scholarship Fellow will report to the Managing Director. This is a three-year fellowship with renewal and promotion subject to review of the position and performance after year two.

Position Duties

  • Maintain the Center’s current online platforms including website maintenance and posting of new content to the website; distribution of email communication; and social media communications.
  • Develop and implement a digital communications strategy for the Center, to include an audit and proposals for use of social media, email communications, and the Center website.
  • Research and propose new tools or methods for accomplishing the Center’s goals of promoting research, disseminating scholarship, and building collaborative academic conversations in law and religion.
  • Consult with Center leadership, including focus area leaders, to identify possibilities for digital scholarship during the development of new initiatives and projects.
  • Collaborate with teaching faculty to incorporate digital scholarship into the classroom.
  • Serve as a resource for affiliated scholars interested in developing digital scholarship tools for research, publication, or pedagogy.
  • Engage with the Center for Digital Scholarship and other Emory University units to leverage the resources for digital scholarship available at Emory University.
  • Attend professional conferences and meetings on digital scholarship and digital humanities.
  • May teach or co-teach courses.
  • May publish scholarly or popular manuscripts on innovations, best practices, and developments in digital scholarship.

Required Qualifications

  • JD, PhD, or equivalent degree in a field related to the Center’s scholarship, such as legal studies, religious studies, theology, political science, or philosophy.
  • Demonstrated engagement with academic scholarship through publications or academic presentations.
  • Knowledge and experience in developing or maintaining a website.
  • Knowledge and experience in using social media platforms.
  • Knowledge and experience in the area of digital scholarship or digital humanities.
  • Demonstrated ability to learn and apply new technologies and software programs.
  • Demonstrated initiative and ability to work independently.
  • Demonstrated ability to collaborate and work with a team of professional staff and faculty.
  • Demonstrated ability to adapt to changing circumstances.

Preferred Qualifications

  • Proven ability to secure project-based grant funding.
  • Prior experience with Cascade CMS, Salesforce CRM, and/or email marketing software.
  • Classroom or online teaching experience.

Posting is scheduled to close Nov. 9, 2018

To apply, visit https://faculty-emory.icims.com/jobs/26839/job.

Lecture: “Les fondements des laïcités en Afrique centrale à l’épreuve du protestantisme évangélique”

Le Centre de recherche Société, Droit et Religions de l’Université de Sherbrooke (SoDRUS), en collaboration avec la Chaire de recherche Droit, Religion et Laïcité, vous propose un cycle de conférences. Nous vous invitons à notre première conférence publique de cette session qui aura lieu le mercredi 31 octobre 2018.

Les fondements des laïcités en Afrique centrale à l’épreuve du protestantisme évangélique

Date : Le mercredi 31 octobre 2018

Heure : De 12 h 00 à 13 h 30

Lieu : Faculté des lettres et sciences humaines. Local A4-166

Cette conférence est donnée par Guy Bucumi, chercheur postdoctoral à la Chaire de recherche Droit, religion et laïcité de la Faculté de droit de l’Université de Sherbrooke. Pour plus d’informations, consultez la page suivante : https://www.usherbrooke.ca/chaire-droit-religion-laicite/accueil/evenements/evenements-details/e/38003/ Pour vous désabonner de la liste d’envoi du SoDRUS, merci de cliquer sur le bouton suivant : Se désabonner

Événement Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/events/739511963063678/

Call for Papers: “Religiosity in East and West – Conceptual and Methodological Challenges”

In Munster (Westphalia), Germany; June, 25th– 27th, 2019

Organizers: Dr. Sarah Demmrich (University of Munster) & Prof. Dr. Ulrich Riegel  (University of Siegen)

The concept of religiosity as a highly individual aspect of religion and its research was shaped in Protestant circles in the Western context (Belzen, 2015). It inspired a huge body of research and further developments in the psychology of religion, the sociology of religion, and theology. In non-Western contexts, however, this concept has been proven only partially effective for the description and measuring of religiosity. This observation raises the question if research on religiosity is a science of Western Christianity (Cutting & Walsh 2008; Hill & Hood, 1999). Even within the Western context the present concepts and instruments are only partially applicable to measure religiosity in highly religious individuals adequately. For example, an orthodox belief, which is practiced in some Protestant Free Churches, often does not contradict with life in a modern society (Vermeer & Scheepers, 2017). This observation raises the question if the contemporary conceptualizations and operationalization of religiosity are too strongly oriented towards the ideal of an enlightened and individualized belief.

In light of these two observations, the Munster conference discusses the established concepts of religiosity and aims to expand them by alternative concepts where appropriate. For example, genuine approaches from non-Western cultures can add to the contemporary discourse of religiosity research (e.g., concepts of Muslim or Hindu religiosity). Similarly, a new understanding of highly religious milieus, which are – against the secularization theory – growing in modern societies, can stimulate a new concept of religiosity beyond individualized belief (e.g., Fresh Expressions, Mega Churches).Besides conceptualizing non-individualized religiosity, another challenge is the application of measures that grew out of the classic concepts of religiosity to the non-Christian and/or non-Western context (Dover, Miner, & Dowson, 2007; Ghorbani, Watson, Sarmast, & Chen, 2018).

However, first approaches of religion-and culture-sensitive measures for different contexts have been developed during the last years (e.g., Abu-Raiya & Pargament, 2011; Ağılkaya-Şahin, 2015; Kamble, Watson, Marigoudar, & Chen, 2014; Loewenthal & Solaim, 2016; Ok, 2016). These do not only allow a more differentiated description of such religiosities, but also facilitate a valid research on its correlates. However, there has been only a few of such alternative measures of non-individualized religiosity until today and more instruments of this kind are needed which proof appropriate to various cultural contexts. In view of the above considerations, the Munster conference wants to create an interdisciplinary scientific forum with scholars from diverse religious and cultural contexts. It aims to stimulate an international and intercultural scientific discourse on concepts and measures of individual religiosity and induce further conceptual developments in this kind of research. We, therefore, encourage scholars.

  • to share both empirical insights in and theoretical reflections on non-individualized religiosity within and outside Western contexts,
  • to critically assess the applicability of existing instruments in both non-Western and orthodox Western contexts, and
  • to present and discuss alternative instruments to measure individual religiosity without an individualization bias

We welcome contributions with a scope on the psychology of religion, the sociology of religion as well as on theology. Additionally, we would be glad to attract scholars from different cultural backgrounds.

Please submit a paper abstract (250 – 300 words) to Sarah Demmrich (kabogan@uni-muenster.de) by January 15, 2019.

For further details on the conference, including information on registration, please check:

https://www.uni-muenster.de/Soziologie/organisation/religiosity_east_and_west.shtml

Funding Opportunity: Global Religion Research Initiative

Global Religion Research Initiative

Hi, I am writing to ask you to share this announcement about five major grant and fellowship opportunities worth $900,000 with your faculty and graduate student colleagues. Could you please forward this email to them and anyone else you know who studies global religion or might possibly be interested in incorporating global religion into their current research and teaching?

Thank you,

Christian Smith
Center for the Study of Religion and Society
Department of Sociology, University of Notre Dame


Funding Opportunity: Global Religion Research Initiative

The Center for the Study of Religion and Society in the Department of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame is pleased to announce the Global Religion Research Initiative (GRRI), directed by Christian Smith and funded by the Templeton Religion Trust of Nassau, Bahamas.

The GRRI will fund over 150 research proposals by distributing $3.1 million to scholars of global religion between 2017 and 2020.

The GRRI offers five distinct competitive research and writing grants and fellowships programs available to scholars at all levels of their careers that intend to significantly advance the social scientific study of religions around the world.

Find out which grant or fellowship fits your idea below.

Dissertation Fellowship Program

Curriculum Development Program

International Collaboration Program

Project Launch Program

Book Leave Program

The application deadline is October 15, 2018.
Apply online at grri.nd.edu.

Global Religion Research Initiative
Center for the Study of Religion and Society
University of Notre Dame
1(800) 434-8441

New Book from Springer: New Developments in the Cognitive Science of Religion

New Developments in the Cognitive Science of Religion: The Rationality of Religious Belief

Van Eyghen, Peels, van den Brink Ed. Vol. 2018 

https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319902388

It is widely thought that the cognitive science of religion (CSR) may have a bearing on the epistemic status of religious beliefs and on other topics in philosophy of religion. Epistemologists have used theories from CSR to argue both for and against the rationality of religious beliefs, or they have claimed that CSR is neutral vis-à-vis the epistemic status of religious belief. However, since CSR is a rapidly evolving discipline, a great deal of earlier research on the topic has become dated. Furthermore, most of the debate on the epistemic consequences of CSR has not taken into account insights from the philosophy of science, such as explanatory pluralism and explanatory levels. This volume overcomes these deficiencies.

This volume brings together new philosophical reflection on CSR. It examines the influence of CSR theories on the epistemic status of religious beliefs; it discusses its impact on philosophy of religion; and it offers new insights for CSR. The book addresses the question of whether or not the plurality of theories in CSR makes epistemic conclusions about religious belief unwarranted. It also explores the impact of CSR on other topics in philosophy of religion like the cognitive consequences of sin and naturalism. Finally, the book investigates what the main theories in CSR aim to explain, and addresses the strengths and weaknesses of CSR.

ISA-RC22 thanks Springer for supporting our Varga Prize for New Generation Scholars.

New Book from Springer: Jewish Population and Identity

Jewish Population and Identity: Challenges and Trends 

DellaPergola, Sergio, Rebhun, Uzi (Eds.) Ed. Vol. 2018     

              

http://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319774459

This book examines the fundamentals of Jewish demography and sociology around the world. It is not only concerned with documenting patterns of population change but also with an intriguing and ever-present issue like “Who is a Jew?” The latter transcends the limits of quantitative assessment and deeply delves into the nature, boundaries, and quality of group identification. A growing challenge is how to bridge between concept – related to ideals and theory – and reality – reflecting field research. Divided into six sections, the book discusses historical demography, immigration and settlement, population dynamics, social stratification and economy, family and Jewish identity in the U.S., and Jewish identity in Israel. The volume represents the dynamic and diverse nature of the study of world and local Jewish populations. It shows how that field of study provides an important contribution to the broader and now rapidly expanding study of religious and ethnic groups.

Scholars in disciplines such as history, geography, sociology, economics, political science, and especially demography follow and analyze the social and cultural patterns of Jews in different places around the globe, at various times, and from complementary perspectives. They make use of historical sources that have recently become accessible, utilize new censuses and surveys, and adopt advanced analytical methods. While some of their observations attest to consistency in the Jews’ demographic and identificational patterns, others evolve and ramify in new directions that reflect general processes in the areas and societies that Jews inhabit, internal changes within Jewish communities, and intergenerational trends in personal preferences of religious and ethnic orientations. This volume brings together contributions from scholars around the world and presents new and updated research and insights.

ISA-RC22 thanks Springer for supporting our Varga Prize for New Generation Scholars.

New Book from Springer: Jewish Medicine and Healthcare in Central Eastern Europe

Jewish Medicine and Healthcare in Central Eastern Europe: Shared Identities, Entangled Histories           

Moskalewicz, Marcin, Caumanns, Ute, Dross, Fritz (Eds.)  Ed. Vol. 2018  

https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319924793

Is ‘Jewish medicine’ a valid historical category? Does it represent a collective constituted by the interplay of medical, ethnic and religious cultures? Integrating academic disciplines from medical history to philology and Jewish studies, this book aims at answering this question historically by presenting  comprehensive coverage of Jewish medical traditions in Central Eastern Europe, mostly on what is today Poland and Germany (and the former Russian, Prussian and Austro-Hungarian Empires). In this significant zone of ethnic, religious and cultural interaction, Jewish, Polish, and German traditions and communities were more entangled, and identities were shared to an extent greater than anywhere else. Starting with early modern times and the Enlightenment, through the 19th century, up until the horrors of medicine in the ghettos and concentration camps, the book collects a variety of perspectives on the question of how Judaism and Jewish culture were dynamically related to medicine and healthcare. It discusses the Halachic traditions, hygiene-related stereotypes, the organization of healthcare within specified communities, academic careers, hybrid medical identities, and diversified medical practices.

ISA-RC22 thanks Springer for supporting our Varga Prize for New Generation Scholars.

New Book from Springer: Xenosophia and Religion

Xenosophia and Religion. Biographical and Statistical Paths for a Culture of Welcome 

Hans Streib & Constantin Klein   Ed. Vol. 2018      

http://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319745633

This book documents the current polarization in Germany regarding the issue of refugee immigration. It presents quantitative estimates for both xenophobia and xenophilia in the German population, including short-time changes. The book suggests a conceptual change of perspectives. It focuses not only on the pathogenic model that accounts for outcomes such as xenophobia, Islamophobia and other forms of (inter-religious) prejudice, but on a salutogenic model. In the book’s view, the salutogenic model entails xenosophia: the wisdom, creativity and inspiration that emerges from the encounter with the strange and the strange religion. The book addresses individual dispositions, which may lead to xenophobia or xenosophia, and takes into account predictors such as religiosity, religious schemata, value preferences, tolerance of complexity, and violence legitimizing norms of masculinity. A selection of case studies present typical biographical trajectories toward xenosophia.

ISA-RC22 thanks Springer for supporting our Varga Prize for New Generation Scholars.