Opinion piece: M. Hashas, “Italian Islam in Mainstream TV: Either Invisible or Visibly Othered”

Italian Islam in Mainstream TV: Either Invisible or Visibly Othered

By Mohammed Hashas

This piece reflects on reputed Italian TV programmes and how they tackle issues of terrorism, Islam and Muslims. Reference will especially be made to these particular programmes and dates, though they do not differ from what I have seen from them for the last six years or so of my stay (studies and work) in this country: Porta a Porta (14/11/2015), Virus and Virus Speciale Parigi (15/11/15; 18/11/15), Ballarò (18/11/15; 24/11/15), Linea Notte TG3 (20/11/15), L’Arena (22/11/15). Among these, Ballarò – and mildly so also Porta a Porta of Bruno Vespa – seems to have discussed the Paris tragedy in the fairest manners, presented by Massimo Giannini who holds the tone of a journalist that tries to present and understand, instead of the tone of provocation and suspicion that Virus and L’Arena have shown on this particular topic. However reputed the list of these programmes may be, and however many fair observers agree with these reflections and findings, one has to underline the fact that this is not a systematic study of all mainstream Italian media. Still, broadly, the mainstream presentation of the issue is simply very negative, biased, dis-informed, and lacks professionalism. The Italian mainstream media is not open, and it entertains itself with the little it knows and does. This makes it fall into prejudices, un-ethical statements, and lack of professionalism with regards to Islam and Muslims whose contribution to society dynamics remains invisible and whose values remain stigmatized, misrepresented and othered.
 
Outline:
 
-The Invisible Mainstream Arab-Islamic World
-The Visible Islam: The Case of the Ex-Muslim Magdi Allam
-The Invisible Italian Islam: The Case of COREIS
-Stereotypical Fallacies: Examples
-The Invisible Italian Scholars of Islam
-“Not In My Name” Rally: Why Only Few Muslims Went to the Streets?
 

Full article at Resetdoc Dialogues on Civilizations, Rome: